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I'm writing some explicit operators to convert database model types to my domain model. Like so (simplified example):

public static explicit operator DomainModel.Role(Role roleEntity)
{
   DomainModel.Role role = new DomainModel.Role
   {
      RoleId = roleEntity.RoleId,
      Name = roleEntity.Name
   };

   return role;
}

However it's possible that the roleEntity parameter is null. Most of times in the .net framework an explicit cast of a null instance results in an exception. Like so:

user.Role = (DomainModel.Role)_userRepository.GetRole(user); // Would normally results in a NullReferenceException

But if the explicit operator would be adjusted, the above would function as expected:

public static explicit operator DomainModel.Role(Role roleEntity)
{
   DomainModel.Role role = roleEntity == null ? null : new DomainModel.Role
   {
      RoleId = roleEntity.RoleId,
      Name = roleEntity.Name
   };

   return role;
}

Question:

  • Is it logical to create such explicit operators?
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1  
I would seriously consider writing that second Role with a Namespace prefix too. –  Henk Holterman Aug 2 '11 at 10:30

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

To the title-question: An explicit operator is allowed to throw (while an implicit operator should not).

But whether a null is a valid reason to do so is a design decision, I would think not.

Consider:

object x = null;
string t = (string)x;

which does not throw.

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I guess you're right. It is somewhat expected behavior that a NullReferenceException is thrown. –  Herman Cordes Aug 3 '11 at 6:28

I would use a library such as a AutoMapper to facilitate conversion between similar types. You can get greater flexibility and write less code. IMHO, using explicit cast operators is less understandable when reading code, it gives an impression that it is a cheap operation when it could be pretty complex mapping code.

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Understand your idea. Thanks for suggestion. –  Herman Cordes Aug 3 '11 at 6:27

I think yes. Casting a null reference to another type should in general result in a null reference, to match with the normal semantics.

e.g. since this works:

object x = null;
var role = (DomainModel.Role)x;

This should also work:

Role x = null;
var role = (DomainModel.Role)x;
share|improve this answer

IMHO opinion no, you should not do this.

I see no difference at all between:

 string myString= (string)null;

and

 Object o = null;
 string myString= (string)o;

In both cases I would want a null returned which is the default behavior (I would not recommend a NullReferenceException either as both code snippets above are completely valid: both explicit conversions return null).

I would find it somewhat bewildering that a null reference could somehow be converted into a default object:

object o = null;
string myString = (string)o; //myString == String.Empty WTF?

If this scenario makes sense I would implement it through a constructor or a specific static method where it is clear that you are creating a new object, never through an implicit or explicit operator.

Cast operators should do just what the are meant to do: convert from one type to another. null can only be "converted" to null.

share|improve this answer
    
@Henk Holterman: Not at all. The problem is I wasn't sure what the default behavior in C# was. Once I verified that casting a null does not throw then the answer is obvious IMO (I wrongly assumed at first that the default behavior was to throw). The basic idea remains the same: do not change the expected behavior. –  InBetween Aug 2 '11 at 11:37
    
And I mis-read the Edit history. Sorry. –  Henk Holterman Aug 2 '11 at 11:41

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