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A warning is showing every time I synchronize on a non-final class field. Here is the code:

public class X  
{  
   private Object o;  

   public void setO(Object o)  
   {  
     this.o = o;  
   }  

   public void x()  
   {  
     synchronized (o) // synchronization on a non-final field  
     {  
     }  
   }  
 } 

so i changed the coding in the following way..

 public class X  
 {  

   private final Object o;       
   public X()
   {  
     o = new Object();  
   }  

   public void x()  
   {  
     synchronized (o)
     {  
     }  
   }  
 }  

I am not sure the above code is the proper way to synchronize on a non-final class field. How can I synchronize a non final field?

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5 Answers

up vote 31 down vote accepted

First of all, I encourage you to really try hard to deal with concurrency issues on a higher level, i.e. solving it using classes from java.util.concurrent such as ExecutorServices, Callables, Futures etc.

That being said, there's nothing wrong with synchronizing on a non-final field per se. You just need to keep in mind that if the object reference changes, the same section of code may be run in parallel. I.e., if one thread runs the code in the synchronized block and someone calls setO(...), another thread can run the same synchronized block concurrently.

Synchronize on each object on which you need exclusive access to (or an object "guarding" the ones you need exclusive access to). If this includes several fields of the class, you might want to reconsider the design and perhaps introduce another level of abstraction.

(Important points by @Jon Skeet below, read carefully :-)

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1  
I'm saying that, if you synchronize on a non-final field, you should be aware of the fact that the snippet of code runs with exclusive access to the object o referred to at the time the synchronized block was reached. If the object which o refers to changes, another thread can come along and execute the synchronized code block. –  aioobe Aug 2 '11 at 10:53
10  
I disagree with your rule of thumb - I prefer to synchronize on an object whose sole purpose is to guard other state. If you're never doing anything with an object other than locking on it, you know for sure that no other code can lock it. If you lock on a "real" object whose methods you then call, that object can synchronize on itself too, which makes it harder to reason about the locking. –  Jon Skeet Aug 2 '11 at 10:59
    
Hmm.. that's a good point. Answer updated. Still though, I think it's perfectly valid to lock on non-final fields, as long as one is aware of the semantics of the synchronized blocks. –  aioobe Aug 2 '11 at 11:03
1  
As I say in my answer, I think I'd need to have it justified very carefully to me, why you would want to do such a thing. And I wouldn't recommend synchronizing on this, either - I would recommend creating a final variable in the class solely for the purposes of locking, which stops anyone else from locking on the same object. –  Jon Skeet Aug 2 '11 at 11:05
1  
That's another good point, and I agree; locking on a non-final variable definitely needs careful justification. –  aioobe Aug 2 '11 at 11:08
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It's really not a good idea - because your synchronized blocks are no longer really synchronized in a consistent way.

Assuming the synchronized blocks are meant to be ensuring that only one thread accesses some shared data at a time, consider:

  • Thread 1 enters the synchronized block. Yay - it has exclusive access to the shared data...
  • Thread 2 calls setO()
  • Thread 3 (or still 2...) enters the synchronized block. Eek! It think it has exclusive access to the shared data, but thread 1 is still furtling with it...

Why would you want this to happen? Maybe there are some very specialized situations where it makes sense... but you'd have to present me with a specific use case (along with ways of mitigating the sort of scenario I've given above) before I'd be happy with it.

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One use case would be if o for instance referred to an ArrayList, and the synchronized block accessed this list methods. It would be unnecessary to lock on a separate "instance-global" lock object. (Assuming here that the class wants to provide a set-method for o.) –  aioobe Aug 2 '11 at 11:06
    
@aioobe: But then thread 1 could still be running some code which is mutating the list (and frequently referring to o) - and part way through its execution start mutating a different list. How would that be a good idea? I think we fundamentally disagree on whether or not it's a good idea to lock on objects you touch in other ways. I would rather be able to reason about my code without any knowledge of what other code does in terms of locking. –  Jon Skeet Aug 2 '11 at 11:08
    
True. It messes up the reasoning. I agree. –  aioobe Aug 2 '11 at 11:11
    
The important part is that the lock object should be somehow associated with the data which you will protect by it, I think. –  Paŭlo Ebermann Aug 2 '11 at 16:52
    
@Paŭlo: Well, it's more than just that - you also need to make sure that a thread never starts accessing shared data associated with one lock when it actually only owns a different lock. You could potentially achieve that by putting a synchronized(o) block inside setO - but it's a little odd to say the least... –  Jon Skeet Aug 2 '11 at 16:57
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If o never changes for the lifetime of an instance of X, the second version is better style irrespective of whether synchronization is involved.

Now, whether there's anything wrong with the first version is impossible to answer without knowing what else is going on in that class. I would tend to agree with the compiler that it does look error-prone (I won't repeat what the others have said).

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Just adding my two cents: I had this warning when I used component that is instantiated through designer, so it's field cannot really be final, because constructor cannot takes parameters. In other words, I had quasi-final field without the final keyword.

I think that's why it is just warning: you are probably doing something wrong, but it might be right as well.

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I agree with one of John's comment: You must always use a final lock dummy while accessing a non-final variable to prevent inconsistencies in case of the variable's reference changes. So in any cases and as a first rule of thumb:

Rule#1: If a field is non-final, always use a (private) final lock dummy.

Reason #1: You hold the lock and change the variable's reference by yourself. Another thread waiting outside the synchronized lock will be able to enter the guarded block.

Reason #2: You hold the lock and another thread changes the variable's reference. The result is the same: Another thread can enter the guarded block.

But when using a final lock dummy, there is another problem: You might get wrong data, because your non-final object will only be synchronized with RAM when calling synchronize(object). So, as a second rule of thumb:

Rule#2: When locking a non-final object you always need to do both: Using a final lock dummy and the lock of the non-final object for the sake of RAM synchronisation. (The only alternative will be declaring all fields of the object as volatile!)

These locks are also called "nested locks". Note that you must call them always in the same order, otherwise you will get a dead lock:

public class X {
    private final LOCK;
    private Object o;

    public void setO(Object o){
        this.o = o;  
    }  

    public void x() {
        synchronized (LOCK) {
        synchronized(o){
            //do something with o...
        }
        }  
    }  
} 

As you can see I write the two locks directly on the same line, because they always belong together. Like this, you could even do 10 nesting locks:

synchronized (LOCK1) {
synchronized (LOCK2) {
synchronized (LOCK3) {
synchronized (LOCK4) {
    //entering the locked space
}
}
}
}

Note that this code won't break if you just acquire an inner lock like synchronized (LOCK3) by another threads. But it will break if you call in another thread something like this:

synchronized (LOCK4) {
synchronized (LOCK1) {  //dead lock!
synchronized (LOCK3) {
synchronized (LOCK2) {
    //will never enter here...
}
}
}
}

There is only one workaround around such nested locks while handling non-final fields:

Rule #2 - Alternative: Declare all fields of the object as volatile. (I won't talk here about the disadvantages of doing this, e.g. preventing any storage in x-level caches even for reads, aso.)

So therefore aioobe is quite right: Just use java.util.concurrent. Or begin to understand everything about synchronisation and do it by yourself with nested locks. ;)

For more details why synchronisation on non-final fields breaks, have a look into my test case: http://stackoverflow.com/a/21460055/2012947

And for more details why you need synchronized at all due to RAM and caches have a look here: http://stackoverflow.com/a/21409975/2012947

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