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I'm creating a script to update my linux distribution if I need to wipe the HD or I need to install Linux on another machine. So this script basically install all the programs I usually need. At the beginning a have a "read" command that asks if I want to install all the packages automatically or not. If I choose not, for each program not found it should ask me I want it to be installed and I use this code

if [[ $installall == "yes" ]]; then
    echo " Installing $sciprog..."
    sudo apt-get install -y $sciprog >/dev/null
    {
        scitest=`dpkg -s $sciprog | grep Status`
    } 2>${HOME}/musthave.errorlog
    if [[ $scitest != "Status: install ok installed" ]]; then
        echo " I've encountered problems installing $sciprog that I can't resolve. "
        echo " Consider installing $sciprog manually. "
        {
            echo "=========="
            echo " $sciprog"
        } >>${HOME}/musthave.notinstalled
    else
        echo " $sciprog installed correctly!"
        {
            echo "=========="
            echo " $sciprog"
        } >>${HOME}/musthave.installed
    fi
else
    echo " Seems like $sciprog is not installed... Do you want to download it?"
    echo " Type 'y' for yes."

    read secondyn ### THIS IS THE GUILTY COMMAND ###

    if [[ $secondyn == "y" ]]; then
        echo " Installing $sciprog ..."
        sudo apt-get install -y $sciprog >/dev/null
        {
            checkinstall=`dpkg -s $sciprog | grep Status`
        } 2>>${HOME}/musthave.errorlog
        if [[ $checkinstall != "Status: install ok installed" ]]; then
            echo " I've encountered problems installing $sciprog that I can't resolve. "
            echo " Consider installing $sciprog manually. "
            {
                echo "=========="
                echo " $sciprog"
            } >>${HOME}/musthave.notinstalled
        else
            echo " $sciprog installed correctly!"
            {
                echo "=========="
                echo " $sciprog"
            } >>${HOME}/musthave.installed
        fi
    else
        echo " Skipping $sciprog ..."
        {
            echo "=========="
            echo " $sciprog"
        } >>${HOME}/musthave.notinstalled
    fi
### some more code which works as expected. All the code above is inside a 
### while...do...done loop which reads line by line the file at the end
done <${HOME}/file.list

But if I run the script, it skips the "read" command in the else clause and assumes it to be "n"...

I can't figure out why, there are other read function also inside if...then...else...fi loops and they work as expected...

Any ideas?

share|improve this question
    
It's hard to tell because it looks like your indenting got mangled horribly in posting, but you seem to be missing a final fi. Also, the read works for me. –  jw013 Aug 2 '11 at 11:59
    
Also, what is the shebang at the top of your script? #!/bin/bash or other? AND, just to be sure, you are running this from a command-line in a terminal session, yes? If you are crontabing it, the script will read a '' as the result and keep going. Good luck. –  shellter Aug 2 '11 at 15:01
    
@jw013 well, maybe it has been cut while I copied/pasted it but the fis are correct, otherwise the script would raise an error –  Marcello Massaro Aug 2 '11 at 15:30
    
@shellter it's #!/bin/bash yes. And yes, I run the script from the command line using ./script.sh –  Marcello Massaro Aug 2 '11 at 15:31
    
@Vieler : Forgot to ask, do you see the messages above the read but inside the else? (It seems like you know what you're doing, so sorry for asking what is probably too obvious a question) ; Good luck! –  shellter Aug 2 '11 at 17:59

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The relevant portions of the code are still not complete but based on the comments I'm going to guess that your while loop looks like

while read -r ... ; do 
    # do stuff ...

    # read user input
    read -r var

done < file

From this the problem is immediately apparent: the inner read is getting its input from the same place as the outer loop, namely stdin which has been redirected from file, and not the user. For a slightly more portable alternative that does not depend on kernel-level support for /dev/tty, just use a different file descriptor other than stdin for the while loop.

while read -r ... <&9; do
    # loop stuff

    # stdin still attached to the terminal untouched, 
    # so this reads from the terminal as expected
    read -r var 

done 9< file

Notice that this example uses fd 9 for the file, leaving fd 0 (stdin) alone. Take a look at the BashFAQ 089 for more details.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, that was the problem. Also I guess this solution is better for portability so thanks for putting me on the right track. –  Marcello Massaro Aug 3 '11 at 10:04
read secondyn < /proc/${PPID}/fd/0

That will look to the parent's input, which should still be stdin.

share|improve this answer

Try reading from the controlling terminal device:

read secondyn </dev/tty
share|improve this answer
    
yep, that worked for me, thanks a lot. –  Marcello Massaro Aug 3 '11 at 9:26

You'll be able to debug it your self if you run your script with bash -x

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, thank you @hmontoliu . In the code I've posted I've forgot to say that stdin was redirected to a file. So I found that "read" actually retrieved the next line from the file and used it as an answer! Is there a way to re-redirect to stdin just that line? –  Marcello Massaro Aug 2 '11 at 15:41
    
Since stdin is not being redirected anywhere inside the script you must be doing it externally. How exactly are you running the script? –  jw013 Aug 2 '11 at 15:47
    
@jw013 actually the script is fairly long and stdin IS redirected inside the script because that piece of code is inside a while...do...done loop whose stdin is redirected to a file. I'll modify the code in the question to make thi a bit clearer. –  Marcello Massaro Aug 3 '11 at 9:16
    
@Vieler You can actually trim out almost all of the echos and replace whole blocks with # do stuff ..., as they are irrelevant and their bulk tends to hide the relevant parts. Just keep the if control structures and the single read command and fill in the rest of the script. I suspect the real issue is in the redirections so it is important that you describe those accurately in order for anyone to be able to figure out what is going on. Clairvoyance is a rare trait these days :) –  jw013 Aug 3 '11 at 9:25
    
@jw013 Yes, my apologies. :( I should have posted a thinner code, I'll keep in mind that next time I'll ask a question. :) –  Marcello Massaro Aug 3 '11 at 9:29

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