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I am trying to re-architect a web application I developed to use the MVC pattern, but I'm not sure how to handle errors. For example:

class AM_Products extends AM_Object 
{
    public function save( $new_data = array() ) 
    {
        // Validate input

        // Save input
    }
}

If I pass invalid input to save, should I throw an exception like this:

class AM_Products extends AM_Object 
{
    public function save( $new_data = array() ) 
    {
        // Validate input
        if ( ! validate( 'text', $new_data['name'] ) ) {
            throw new Exception( 'Invalid data entered' );
        }

        // Save input
    }
}

Or instead, should I add an extra function and leave it to the view/controller:

if ( $product->save( $data )->has_error() ) {
    $error = $product->get_error();
}

echo '<p>' . $error . '</p>';
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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Don't throw an exception. Exceptions are for exceptional situations - invalid data entered into a form should not trigger an exception.

Your model should have some sort of error state set, either on the model itself or on the individual fields. The post-back should "fall through" and display the same form that was originally shown, with error messages and/or highlighted fields indicating where the error is so the user can fix it.

Throwing exceptions for validation is going to lead to a very fragile and difficult to use system. What happens if you want to simply show the user that one of the fields they supplied is invalid and give them a chance to correct it? How are you going to catch an exception and know how to display the associated record/form?

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it's applicable if error is catched in the view layer (data validation). If the error happened in the model layer, you have to throw exception. Model layer should not know if data is coming from HTML form, web service or anything other. –  Darhazer Jan 19 '12 at 16:34
    
@Darhazer That is crazy and outright wrong. Your model layer is where data validation must occur, that is one of the biggest reasons to have models in the first place. You absolutely should not be doing that kind of validation in the view layer. And there is no reason for your model to throw an exception if a user enters an invalid email address. That is not an exceptional condition. –  meagar Jan 19 '12 at 16:45

Throw an exception. Otherwise you'll have to remember always to call has_error/get_error after any operation. And you'll have a lot of duplicated code. And what if the error should be handled not by the method a() that have called save(), but by the method b() that called the method a()? you'll have to return error from a(), and b() will have to check for the error as well.

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1  
I agree. And I'd like to add that I always create a new Exception class based on Exception() so they are easily catchable. Example: class NoSuchProductException extends Exception {}; this way you'll be able to } catch (NoSuchProductException $e) { and not have to rely on the supplied text of the exception to determine what happened. And then just throw new NoSuchProductException($productId); - this way you'll be able to use the data of the exception as an indicator of what it is that wasn't found or couldn't be created, validated and what not. –  Thomas Daugaard Aug 2 '11 at 12:57
    
@Thomas Attempting to update a record which doesn't exist is different from attempting to update a record with invalid information, the way you handle each situation isn't necessarily related. –  meagar Aug 2 '11 at 13:02

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