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the same way you can do the following...

<xsl:for-each select="catalog/cd[artist='Bob Dylan']">

Can you do the same filtering with the Value-Of statement?

<xsl:value-of select="value[name='Name']" />

Thanks, james.

Edit:

Sorry for the confusion.

I had some XML:

<DynamicData>
    <item>
      <name>Name</name>
      <value xsi:type="xsd:int">0</value>
    </item>
    <item>
      <name>Value</name>
      <value xsi:type="xsd:long">9</value>
    </item>
</DynamicData>

I wanted to use a filter on my value-of select, much in the same way as is possible when doing a for-each. I've only just started looking at XSLT, so wasnt sure of its abilities. In the end i used the following XSLT:

<set>   
    <xsl:attribute name="name"> 
       <xsl:choose>
        <xsl:when test="item[name='Name']/value=0">Low</xsl:when>
        <xsl:when test="item[name='Name']/value=1">Medium</xsl:when>
        <xsl:when test="item[name='Name']/value=2">High</xsl:when>  
       </xsl:choose>
    </xsl:attribute>
    ...

The problem I was having was i was putting the filter after the value element in the test, like so. <xsl:when test="item/value[name='Name']=2">High</xsl:when> Obviously the 'name' element isnt an element of 'value' but an element of 'item' hence why this didnt work.

Thanks for your help everyone, i got there in the end :)

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What is your desired result, could you provide some sample input/output? –  Bob Vale Aug 3 '11 at 13:12
    
Updated my question. –  Cadab Aug 4 '11 at 8:59

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Yes, select takes an XPATH expression as it's argument

XSL:value-of

Whilst the specification states you can, it could depend on the implementation your XML/XSL engine.

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It is indeed possible, the problem i was having was i was doing the filtering 'too far' into the elements so to speak. I was doing "item/value[name='Name']" instead of "item[name='Name']/value". The 'name element was an element of 'item' and not 'value' –  Cadab Aug 3 '11 at 15:33

Remember that in XSLT 1.0 <xsl:value-of select="someNodeSet"/> outputs only the string value of the first node in someNodeSet

On the other side:

<xsl:for-each select="someNodeSet">
 <xsl:value-of select="."/>
</xsl:for-each>

outputs the string value of every node in someNodeSet.

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1  
You're speaking of XSLT 1.0. In 2.0, xsl:value-of outputs all the values, space separated, (and allows you to choose a different separator). –  Michael Kay Aug 2 '11 at 18:47
    
@Michael Kay: Yes. –  Dimitre Novatchev Aug 2 '11 at 20:14
    
@Michael Kay: Edited the answer to explicitly say: "in XSLT 1.0" –  Dimitre Novatchev Aug 3 '11 at 5:32
    
In XSLT 1.0 xsl:copy-of and text() test node could effectively replace the xsl:for-each as used by OP. –  empo Aug 3 '11 at 12:36
    
@empo: Of course. But the question he is asking is to compare <xsl:for-each> and <xsl:value-of> –  Dimitre Novatchev Aug 3 '11 at 13:09

Do note that in XSLT 1.0 you can workaround this with xsl:copy-of and text() test node.


Example, given this input:

<catalog>
    <cd>
        <artist>Bob Dylan</artist>
    </cd>
    <cd>
        <artist>Pink Floyd</artist>
        <title>ummagumma</title>
    </cd>
    <cd>
        <artist>Pink Floyd</artist>
        <title>Atom Earth Mother</title>
    </cd>
</catalog> 

You can use xsl:copy-of as follows:

 <xsl:copy-of select="catalog/cd[artist='Pink Floyd']/title/text()"/>

will return the value of all the matching nodes exactly as in:

 <xsl:for-each select="catalog/cd[artist='Pink Floyd']/title">
   <xsl:value-of select="."/>
 </xsl:for-each>
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