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I'm trying to query data of the form with LINQ-to-EF:

class Location {
    string Country;
    string City;
    string Address;
    …
}

by looking up a location by the tuple (Country, City, Address). I tried

var keys = new[] {
    new {Country=…, City=…, Address=…},
    …
}

var result = from loc in Location
             where keys.Contains(new {
                 Country=loc.Country, 
                 City=loc.City, 
                 Address=loc.Address
             }

but LINQ doesn't want to accept an anonymous type (which I understand is the way to express tuples in LINQ) as the parameter to Contains().

Is there a "nice" way to express this in LINQ, while being able to run the query on the database? Alternately, if I just iterated over keys and Union()-ed the queries together, would that be bad for performance?

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9 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted
+200

How about:

var result = locations.Where(l => keys.Any(k => 
                    k.Country == l.Country && 
                    k.City == l.City && 
                    k.Address == l.Address));

UPDATE

Unfortunately EF throws NotSupportedException on that, which disqualifies this answer if you need the query to run on DB side.

UPDATE 2

Tried all kinds of joins using custom classes and Tuples - neither works. What data volumes are we talking about? If it's nothing too big, you could either process it client-side (convenient) or use unions (if not faster, at least less data is transmitted).

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since question is for Linq to Entities I doubt this would work, otherwise good suggestion. –  BrokenGlass Aug 2 '11 at 13:31
    
I'm testing it right now to see if EF understands that. Another ORM I use would do fine. –  Jacek Gorgoń Aug 2 '11 at 13:37
    
I'll accept this one as a detailed "this doesn't seem to be possible in LINQ-to-EF" answer. The data volume in my case isn't high so I went with Union()-ing the queries together (because dynamically building a predicate in LINQ is painful), and crossing my fingers that SQL Server can figure out it's all hits against the same index. –  millimoose Aug 12 '11 at 16:45
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I don't think that will work for you since when you are newing up an object in the Contains method it will create a new object each time. Since those object are anonymous the way they will be compared are against their reference which will be different for each object.

Also, look at Jacek's answer.

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There is a catch there. According to msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb397696.aspx two instances of the same anonymous type are equal only if all their properties are equal. which means that Chris's way should work too. –  Jacek Gorgoń Aug 2 '11 at 13:34
    
@Thomas: Contains uses the equality comparer, which for anonymous types uses property equality - this is not the issue. –  BrokenGlass Aug 2 '11 at 13:36
    
You are totally right. But is @Jacek solution helping you? –  Tomas Jansson Aug 2 '11 at 14:44
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Have you tried just using the Tuple class?

var keys = new[] {
    Tuple.Create("Country", "City", "Address"),
    …
}

var result = from loc in Location
             where keys.Contains(Tuple.Create(loc.Country, loc.City, loc.Address))
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This doesn't compile with: Delegate 'System.Func<Location,int,bool>' does not take 1 arguments –  millimoose Aug 3 '11 at 14:16
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If you're not going to need a lot of key combinations, you can simply add a LocationKey property to your data. To avoid wasting a lot of storage, maybe make it the hash code of the combined properties.

Then query on will simply have a condition on LocationKey. Finally, in the client side filter the results to drop entities that had the same hash but not the same location.

It would look something like:

class Location 
{
    private string country;
    public string Country
    {
        get { return country; }
        set { country = value; UpdateLocationKey(); }
    }

    private string city;
    public string City
    {
        get { return city; }
        set { city = value; UpdateLocationKey(); }
    }

    private string address;
    public string Address
    {
        get { return address; }
        set { address = value; UpdateLocationKey(); }
    }

    private void UpdateLocationKey()
    {
        LocationKey = Country.GetHashCode() ^ City.GetHashCode() ^ Address.GetHashCode();
    }

    int LocationKey;
    …
}

Then simply query on the LocationKey property.

Not ideal, but it should work.

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The database schema I'm working with actually has the mapping of location components to a key in the database, and the query I'm building is looking those up. The idea of hashing them together instead of storing an explicit mapping is a good one though. –  millimoose Aug 12 '11 at 16:52
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var result = from loc in Location
             where keys.Contains(new {
                 Country=l.Country, 
                 City=l.City, 
                 Address=l.Address
             }

would need to be:

var result = from loc in Location
             where keys.Contains(new {
                 Country=loc.Country, 
                 City=loc.City, 
                 Address=loc.Address
             }
             select loc;
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That was a typo I made creating the simplified example, I fixed the question. –  millimoose Aug 2 '11 at 14:26
    
I'm plussing this answer, the only thing it lacks is the select line and the end of the query. –  Evren Kuzucuoglu Aug 12 '11 at 10:46
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My solution is to build a new extension method WhereOr which use an ExpressionVisitor to build the query :

public delegate Expression<Func<TSource, bool>> Predicat<TCle, TSource>(TCle cle);

public static class Extensions
{
    public static IQueryable<TSource> WhereOr<TSource, TCle>(this IQueryable<TSource> source, IEnumerable<TCle> cles, Predicat<TCle, TSource> predicat)
        where TCle : ICle,new()
    {
        Expression<Func<TSource, bool>> clause = null;

        foreach (var p in cles)
        {
            clause = BatisseurFiltre.Or<TSource>(clause, predicat(p));
        }

        return source.Where(clause);
    }
}

class BatisseurFiltre : ExpressionVisitor
{
    private ParameterExpression _Parametre;
    private BatisseurFiltre(ParameterExpression cle)
    {
        _Parametre = cle;
    }

    protected override Expression VisitParameter(ParameterExpression node)
    {
        return _Parametre;
    }

    internal static Expression<Func<T, bool>> Or<T>(Expression<Func<T, bool>> e1, Expression<Func<T, bool>> e2)
    {
        Expression<Func<T, bool>> expression = null;

        if (e1 == null)
        {
            expression = e2;
        }
        else if (e2 == null)
        {
            expression = e1;
        }
        else
        {
            var visiteur = new BatisseurFiltre(e1.Parameters[0]);
            e2 = (Expression<Func<T, bool>>)visiteur.Visit(e2);

            var body = Expression.Or(e1.Body, e2.Body);
            expression = Expression.Lambda<Func<T, bool>>(body, e1.Parameters[0]);
        }

        return expression;
    }
}

The following generates clean sql code executed on database :

var result = locations.WhereOr(keys, k => (l => k.Country == l.Country && 
                                                k.City == l.City && 
                                                k.Address == l.Address
                                          )
                          );
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Interesting approach, I wonder if this could be implemented with LinqKit? –  millimoose Apr 5 '13 at 17:03
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    var keys = new[] {
        new {Country=…, City=…, Address=…},
        …
    }    
    var result = from loc in Location
                 where keys.Any(k=>k.Country == loc.Country 
&& k.City == loc.City 
&& k.Address == loc.Address) 
select loc

Give this a try.

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I believe this is the same as @Jacek's answer, which doesn't work in LINQ-to-EF. –  millimoose Aug 4 '11 at 11:30
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i think the proper way to do it is

var result = from loc in Location
             where loc.Country = _country
             where loc.City = _city
             where loc.Address = _address
             select loc

It looks unoptimized but the query provider will go out and do the optimization when it transforms the query to sql. When using tuples or other classes, the query provider doesnt know how to transform them into sql and that what causes the NotSupportedException

-edit-

If you have multiple key tuples i think you have to loop through them all and do the above query for each one. again, that might seem underoptimized, but the query for retriving all the locations in a single query would probably end up beeing quite long:

select * from locations 
where (locations.Country = @country1 and locations.City = @city1, locations.Adress = @adress1)
or (locations.Country = @country2 and locations.City = @city2, locations.Adress = @adress2)
or ...

The fastest way of doing it is probably to do the simple queries, but send them as a single sql script and use multiple result sets for actually getting each value. Im not sure you can get EF to do that though.

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yes, generating a full query instead of using the or approach would be even longer, but one could make the short query into a prepared statement and it would thereby be faster. im not sure if any of that is supported by EF though –  aL3891 Aug 11 '11 at 8:39
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I'd replace Contains (which is a method specific to lists and arrays) with the wider IEnumerable's Any extension method:

var result = Location
    .Where(l => keys.Any(k => l.Country == k.Country && l.City = k.City && l.Address == k.Address);

This can also be written:

var result = from l in Location
             join k in keys
             on l.Country == k.Country && l.City == k.City && l.Address == k.Address
             select l;
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I believe several people already gave this answer, which doesn't work in LINQ-to-EF. –  millimoose Aug 12 '11 at 16:41
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