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I'm very new to SQL so I appologize if this question is difficult to understand.

Let's say I have a table like:

Name    Birthday
Bob     7/18
Bob     7/18
Mark    5/10
Mark    7/5  
Sue     2/1
Joe     1/14
Joe     1/14
Joe     1/2
Jeff    9/16
Jeff    3/20
Jeff    6/13
[...]

I would like to perform a select statement that gives me the Names of the people who have more than one distinct Birthdays.

So, for my example table, the output would be Mark, Joe, and Jeff.

Thanks for your help.

share|improve this question
    
run select @@Version, but saying SQL Server 2008 is good enough –  KM. Aug 2 '11 at 13:42
    
I surgest you test Dem's solution with my test data. You get Jake and Mark instead of Pete and Mark –  t-clausen.dk Aug 2 '11 at 14:31

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

A re-wording as I understand your problem statement:

All Names where:
- The name has more than one Colour associated to it
- Of those, at least two Colours have different birthday's associated to them

What I'm unsure of is whether it's possible to have two different birthdays for the same colour associated to the same name?


If no, the colour becomes irrelevant, you just want a name with more than 1 different birthday associated to it.

SELECT
  Name
FROM
  yourTable
GROUP BY
  name
HAVING
  COUNT(DISTINCT birthday) > 1


If `yes`, you need to find another record with the same name, but also a different colour AND a different birthday. SELECT Name FROM yourTable WHERE EXISTS (SELECT * FROM yourTable as [lookup] WHERE Name = yourTable.Name AND Birthday yourTable.Birthday AND Colour yourTable.Colour) GROUP BY Name
share|improve this answer
    
I am getting the following error message when I try this... Column 'birthday' is invalid in the select list because it is not contained in either an aggregate function or the GROUP BY clause. –  Matt_Bro Aug 2 '11 at 13:43
    
Are you executing the query exactly as is, or are you changing it and adding the Birthday field in as well? –  MatBailie Aug 2 '11 at 13:44
    
I am substituting column names for the actual column names in my table. I'm not sure what you mean by adding the Birthday field... –  Matt_Bro Aug 2 '11 at 13:47
    
and the answer to the question in your answer is no, it is not possible to have two different birthdays for the same colour associated to the same name. –  Matt_Bro Aug 2 '11 at 13:50
    
In my example query I SELECT x and also GROUP BY x. If you change x in one, you must change x in the other as well; You can't SELECT what you don't GROUP BY. –  MatBailie Aug 2 '11 at 13:51
SELECT name FROM table_xyz 
GROUP BY Name, Birthday
HAVING count(*) = 1
share|improve this answer
    
THe result should be Mark not Bob ... –  user874687 Aug 2 '11 at 13:33
    
If Mark had just one birthday (and so implicitly just 1 colour) your query would still return Mark. –  MatBailie Aug 2 '11 at 13:39
    
Mark can have the same birthday and two different colors. I want the people who have different birthdays associated with the different colors. –  Matt_Bro Aug 2 '11 at 13:48

try this:

select
    NAME
    FROM (select
              NAME
              FROM YourTable
              GROUP BY Name,Birthday
              HAVING Count(Name)=1
         ) dt
    GROUP BY Name
    HAVING COUNT(Name)>1

working sample code for SQL Server:

DECLARE @YourTable table (name varchar(10),Birthday varchar(10), FavoriteColor varchar(10))
INSERT @YourTable VALUES ('Bob'  ,   '7/18'   ,    'Blue')
INSERT @YourTable VALUES ('Bob'  ,   '7/18'   ,    'Green')
INSERT @YourTable VALUES ('Mark' ,   '5/10'   ,    'Blue')
INSERT @YourTable VALUES ('Mark' ,   '7/5'    ,    'Green')

select
    NAME
    FROM (select
              NAME
              FROM @YourTable
              GROUP BY Name,Birthday
              HAVING Count(Name)=1
         ) dt
    GROUP BY Name
    HAVING COUNT(Name)>1

OUTPUT:

NAME
----------
Mark
share|improve this answer
    
it is a difficult to understand question with a lot of ambiguity on the many possible exceptions and how to handle them. –  KM. Aug 2 '11 at 13:47
    
I apologize for the ambiguity. I just want to see the people who have different birthdays associated with different colors. What would you like me to clarify? Thank you for your help :-) –  Matt_Bro Aug 2 '11 at 13:51
    
If you add the record 'Bob', '5/10', 'Red'; Bob should now be included in the results, but won't be. –  MatBailie Aug 2 '11 at 13:58
    
0 rows returned with my testdata –  t-clausen.dk Aug 2 '11 at 14:25
    
@Dems, if you add 'Bob', '5/10', 'Red' should it be displayed? what if you add a 'Jim', '5/12', 'purple' should that be displayed as well? what if you then add a 'Bob', '5/10', 'yellow' will Bob still be displayed? it is easy to change the code to account for all of these, but the specifications are vague on the details of how it should work. –  KM. Aug 2 '11 at 14:25

You can do this several different ways. You can either JOIN the table to itself, or you can use the EXISTS clause.

SELECT DISTINCT
    T1.name
FROM
    Some_Table AS T1
WHERE
    EXISTS (SELECT *
            FROM Some_Table T2
            WHERE T2.name = T1.name AND
                  T2.birthday <> T1.birthday)

or

SELECT DISTINCT
    T1.name
FROM
    Some_Table AS T1
INNER JOIN Some_Table AS T2 ON
    T2.name = T1.name AND
    T2.birthday <> T1.birthday

You could also solve this particular problem using the HAVINGclause:

SELECT
    T1.name
FROM
    Some_Table AS T1
GROUP BY
    T1.name
HAVING
    MAX(birthday) <> MIN(birthday)
share|improve this answer
    
I tested last sql, it didn't work try - insert some_table values('Mark','7/5','yellow') –  t-clausen.dk Aug 2 '11 at 14:00
    
It works fine for me –  Tom H. Aug 2 '11 at 14:47

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