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From this original question, how would I apply a sort on multiple fields?

Using this slightly adapted structure, how would I sort city (ascending) & then price (descending)?

var homes = [
    {"h_id":"3",
     "city":"Dallas",
     "state":"TX",
     "zip":"75201",
     "price":"162500"},
    {"h_id":"4",
     "city":"Bevery Hills",
     "state":"CA",
     "zip":"90210",
     "price":"319250"},
    {"h_id":"6",
     "city":"Dallas",
     "state":"TX",
     "zip":"75000",
     "price":"556699"},
    {"h_id":"5",
     "city":"New York",
     "state":"NY",
     "zip":"00010",
     "price":"962500"}
    ];

I liked the fact than an answer was given which provided a general approach. Where I plan to use this code, I will have to sort dates as well as other things. The ability to "prime" the object seemed handy, if not a little cumbersome.

I've tried to build this answer into a nice generic example, but I'm not having much luck.

share|improve this question
    
Do you want to search or sort? –  Felix Kling Aug 2 '11 at 14:17
    
Sort, sorry typo. –  Mike Aug 2 '11 at 14:17
    
What exactly is the issue you're having with using the second answer you've linked? –  canon Aug 2 '11 at 14:18
    
It's not generic enough. I seem to be adding a sea of code when I simply would like to say sort(["first-field", "ASC"], ["second-field", "DSC"]); This is further complicated when I try to add in the "primer" logic of the first answer so that I can handle dates, case-insensitivity etc. –  Mike Aug 2 '11 at 14:26

7 Answers 7

up vote 14 down vote accepted

A multi dimensional sorting method, based on this answer:

Update: Here is an "optimized" version. It does a lot more preprocessing and creates a comparison function for each sorting option beforehand. It might need more more memory (as it stores a function for each sorting option, but it should preform a bit better as it does not have to determine the correct settings during the comparison. I have not done any profiling though.

var sort_by;

(function() {
    // utility functions
    var default_cmp = function(a, b) {
            if (a == b) return 0;
            return a < b ? -1 : 1;
        },
        getCmpFunc = function(primer, reverse) {
            var dfc = default_cmp, // closer in scope
                cmp = default_cmp;
            if (primer) {
                cmp = function(a, b) {
                    return dfc(primer(a), primer(b));
                };
            }
            if (reverse) {
                return function(a, b) {
                    return -1 * cmp(a, b);
                };
            }
            return cmp;
        };

    // actual implementation
    sort_by = function() {
        var fields = [],
            n_fields = arguments.length,
            field, name, reverse, cmp;

        // preprocess sorting options
        for (var i = 0; i < n_fields; i++) {
            field = arguments[i];
            if (typeof field === 'string') {
                name = field;
                cmp = default_cmp;
            }
            else {
                name = field.name;
                cmp = getCmpFunc(field.primer, field.reverse);
            }
            fields.push({
                name: name,
                cmp: cmp
            });
        }

        // final comparison function
        return function(A, B) {
            var a, b, name, result;
            for (var i = 0; i < n_fields; i++) {
                result = 0;
                field = fields[i];
                name = field.name;

                result = field.cmp(A[name], B[name]);
                if (result !== 0) break;
            }
            return result;
        }
    }
}());

Example usage:

homes.sort(sort_by('city', {name:'price', primer: parseInt, reverse: true}));

DEMO


Original function:

var sort_by = function() {
   var fields = [].slice.call(arguments),
       n_fields = fields.length;

   return function(A,B) {
       var a, b, field, key, primer, reverse, result, i;

       for(i = 0; i < n_fields; i++) {
           result = 0;
           field = fields[i];

           key = typeof field === 'string' ? field : field.name;

           a = A[key];
           b = B[key];

           if (typeof field.primer  !== 'undefined'){
               a = field.primer(a);
               b = field.primer(b);
           }

           reverse = (field.reverse) ? -1 : 1;

           if (a<b) result = reverse * -1;
           if (a>b) result = reverse * 1;
           if(result !== 0) break;
       }
       return result;
   }
};

DEMO

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, this answer has taught me a couple javascript features I was unaware of. –  Mike Aug 2 '11 at 14:51
    
For the record, this function could still be improved by preprocessing the argument list and create a uniform "sort options array". This is left as exercise for the reader ;) –  Felix Kling Aug 5 '11 at 13:38
    
I'm not sure I follow you there but I'm interested in the optimization. –  Mike Aug 5 '11 at 13:44
    
@Mike: Ok, give me some minutes... ;) –  Felix Kling Aug 5 '11 at 13:45
    
@Mike: Ok... finally ;) You see it is more complex now, as the options are preprocessed, but the final comparison function (see comment) is much simpler which (hopefully) leads to better performance. The more sorting options you have, the more advantage you have from this method. –  Felix Kling Aug 5 '11 at 14:22

I made a quite generic multi feature sorter today. You can have a look at thenBy.js here: https://github.com/Teun/thenBy.js

It allows you to use the standard Array.sort, but with firstBy().thenBy().thenBy() style. It is way less code and complexity than the solutions posted above.

share|improve this answer
    
This is cool +1, but then again hardly seems worth the extra trouble compared to just calling sort multiple times. –  torazaburo Aug 4 '13 at 17:12
1  
Well, when you call 3 times, the 2nd call is not guaranteed to leave the order of the first one untouched for items where the second call does not make a difference. –  Teun D Aug 4 '13 at 20:35
    
the magic of JS at work - thanks @TeunD for sharing your vision!!! –  Fausto R. Oct 5 '13 at 16:54
    
That is some clever javascript! Thanks! –  serg Sep 7 at 19:12

Here's another one that's perhaps closer to your idea for the syntax

function sortObjects(objArray, properties /*, primers*/) {
    var primers = arguments[2] || {}; // primers are optional

    properties = properties.map(function(prop) {
        if( !(prop instanceof Array) ) {
            prop = [prop, 'asc']
        }
        if( prop[1].toLowerCase() == 'desc' ) {
            prop[1] = -1;
        } else {
            prop[1] = 1;
        }
        return prop;
    });

    function valueCmp(x, y) {
        return x > y ? 1 : x < y ? -1 : 0; 
    }

    function arrayCmp(a, b) {
        var arr1 = [], arr2 = [];
        properties.forEach(function(prop) {
            var aValue = a[prop[0]],
                bValue = b[prop[0]];
            if( typeof primers[prop[0]] != 'undefined' ) {
                aValue = primers[prop[0]](aValue);
                bValue = primers[prop[0]](bValue);
            }
            arr1.push( prop[1] * valueCmp(aValue, bValue) );
            arr2.push( prop[1] * valueCmp(bValue, aValue) );
        });
        return arr1 < arr2 ? -1 : 1;
    }

    objArray.sort(function(a, b) {
        return arrayCmp(a, b);
    });
}

// just for fun use this to reverse the city name when sorting
function demoPrimer(str) {
    return str.split('').reverse().join('');
}

// Example
sortObjects(homes, ['city', ['price', 'desc']], {city: demoPrimer});

Demo: http://jsfiddle.net/Nq4dk/2/


Edit: Just for fun, here's a variation that just takes an sql-like string, so you can do sortObjects(homes, "city, price desc")

function sortObjects(objArray, properties /*, primers*/) {
    var primers = arguments[2] || {};

    properties = properties.split(/\s*,\s*/).map(function(prop) {
        prop = prop.match(/^([^\s]+)(\s*desc)?/i);
        if( prop[2] && prop[2].toLowerCase() === 'desc' ) {
            return [prop[1] , -1];
        } else {
            return [prop[1] , 1];
        }
    });

    function valueCmp(x, y) {
        return x > y ? 1 : x < y ? -1 : 0; 
    }

    function arrayCmp(a, b) {
        var arr1 = [], arr2 = [];
        properties.forEach(function(prop) {
            var aValue = a[prop[0]],
                bValue = b[prop[0]];
            if( typeof primers[prop[0]] != 'undefined' ) {
                aValue = primers[prop[0]](aValue);
                bValue = primers[prop[0]](bValue);
            }
            arr1.push( prop[1] * valueCmp(aValue, bValue) );
            arr2.push( prop[1] * valueCmp(bValue, aValue) );
        });
        return arr1 < arr2 ? -1 : 1;
    }

    objArray.sort(function(a, b) {
        return arrayCmp(a, b);
    });
}
share|improve this answer
    
this solution is clean but not performant because of the array comparison. you can simply do a look through properties keep track of the compared value and it its not zero, return. that's a lot faster. –  amankapur91 Sep 22 at 19:00

The following function will allow you to sort an array of objects on one or multiple properties, either ascending (default) or descending on each property, and allow you to choose whether or not to perform case sensitive comparisons. By default, this function performs case insensitive sorts.

The first argument must be the array containing the objects. The subsequent argument(s) must be a comma separated list of strings that reference the different object properties to sort by. The last argument (which is optional) is a boolean to choose whether or not to perform case sensitive sorts - use true for case sensitive sorts.

The function will sort each property/key in ascending order by default. If you want a particular key to sort in descending order, then instead pass in an array in this format: ['property_name', true].

Here are some sample uses of the function followed by an explanation (where homes is an array containing the objects):

objSort(homes, 'city') --> sort by city (ascending, case in-sensitive)

objSort(homes, ['city', true]) --> sort by city (descending, case in-sensitive)

objSort(homes, 'city', true) --> sort by city then price (ascending, case sensitive)

objSort(homes, 'city', 'price') --> sort by city then price (both ascending, case in-sensitive)

objSort(homes, 'city', ['price', true]) --> sort by city (ascending) then price (descending), case in-sensitive)

And without further ado, here's the function:

function objSort() {
    var args = arguments,
        array = args[0],
        case_sensitive, keys_length, key, desc, a, b, i;

    if (typeof arguments[arguments.length - 1] === 'boolean') {
        case_sensitive = arguments[arguments.length - 1];
        keys_length = arguments.length - 1;
    } else {
        case_sensitive = false;
        keys_length = arguments.length;
    }

    return array.sort(function (obj1, obj2) {
        for (i = 1; i < keys_length; i++) {
            key = args[i];
            if (typeof key !== 'string') {
                desc = key[1];
                key = key[0];
                a = obj1[args[i][0]];
                b = obj2[args[i][0]];
            } else {
                desc = false;
                a = obj1[args[i]];
                b = obj2[args[i]];
            }

            if (case_sensitive === false && typeof a === 'string') {
                a = a.toLowerCase();
                b = b.toLowerCase();
            }

            if (! desc) {
                if (a < b) return -1;
                if (a > b) return 1;
            } else {
                if (a > b) return -1;
                if (a < b) return 1;
            }
        }
        return 0;
    });
} //end of objSort() function

And here's some sample data:

var homes = [ { "h_id": "3", "city": "Dallas", "state": "TX", "zip": "75201", "price": 162500 }, { "h_id": "4", "city": "Bevery Hills", "state": "CA", "zip": "90210", "price": 1000000 }, { "h_id": "5", "city": "new york", "state": "NY", "zip": "00010", "price": 1000000 }, { "h_id": "6", "city": "Dallas", "state": "TX", "zip": "85000", "price": 300000 }, { "h_id": "7", "city": "New York", "state": "NY", "zip": "00020", "price": 345000 } ];

share|improve this answer
    
omg! THat works like a charm! Nice work –  Saike Aug 9 at 12:05

for a non-generic, simple solution to your exact problem:

homes.sort(
   function(a,b){
      if (a.city!=b.city){
         return (b.price-a.price);
      } else {
         return (a.city-b.city);
      }
   });
share|improve this answer
homes.sort(function(a,b) { return a.city - b.city } );
homes.sort(function(a,b){
    if (a.city==b.city){
        return parseFloat(b.price) - parseFloat(a.price);
    } else {
        return 0;
    }
});
share|improve this answer
    
Why not just put everything into a single function? If city is not equal, return the diff of them, else, diff the price. –  Mad Physicist Aug 29 at 4:35

Here is a generic version of @Snowburnt's solution:

var sortarray = [{field:'city', direction:'asc'}, {field:'price', direction:'desc'}];
array.sort(function(a,b){
    for(var i=0; i<sortarray.length; i++){
        retval = a[sortarray[i].field] < b[sortarray[i].field] ? -1 : a[sortarray[i].field] > b[sortarray[i].field] ? 1 : 0;
        if (sortarray[i].direction == "desc") {
            retval = retval * -1;
        }
        if (retval !== 0) {
            return retval;
        }
    }
}


})

This is based on a sort routine I'm using. I didn't test this specific code so it may have errors but you get the idea. The idea is to sort based on the first field that indicates a difference and then stop and go to the next record. So, if you're sorting by three fields and the first field in the compare is enough to determine the sort order of the two records being sorted then return that sort result and go to the next record.

I tested it (actually with a little more complex sort logic) on 5000 records and it did it in the blink of an eye. If you're actually loading more than 1000 records to the client you should probably be using sever-side sorting and filtering.

This code isn't handling case-sensitivity but I leave it to the reader to handle this trivial modification.

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