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I am thinking of using some spare time to play around with designing and implementing a teaching tool for a course on formal languages and automata theory. I am trying to decide whether an OOP implementation would be appropriate and, if so, whether anyone can suggest high-level improvements to the design I outline below.

There are lots of potential classes revealed in the linguistic analysis. Some (and please let me know if I've missed anything fundamental) are: grammar; nonterminal; terminal; production; regular grammar; context-free grammar; context-sensitive grammar; unrestricted grammar; automaton; state; symbol; transition; DFA; NFA; NFA-Lambda; DPDA; PDA; LBA; Turing machine.

Question 1: Should each kind of grammar get its own class in the implementation, or should an over-arching grammar class have methods to determine what kind of grammar it is (e.g., "isRegular()", "isContextFree()", etc.) (more generally, should classes which differ only a little in the domain model, and only in terms of behavior, be represented via inheritance in the implementation, or is it better to simply push different kinds of behavior into the parent class?)

Question 2: Should things like "Symbol", "State", "Nonterminal", etc. get their own classes in the implementation, or should these be dominated by their containers? (more generally, should very simple classes in the domain model be given their own classes in the implementation - e.g. for extensibility - or should that be pushed into the container class?)

Question 3: Should Transition be its own class in the implementation and, if so, will I need to subclass it in order to support each kind of automaton (since, besides differing in terms of the state, they also differ in terms of what happens during transitions)? (more generally, is it good practice to have two abstract parent classes where there is a bijection between the children of one and the children of another... coupling?)

I realize that, at the end of the day, a lot of these decisions are simply design decisions, but I would like to know what you guys think about best practices in OOP design. Moreover, and the reason I'm not just asking the "more generally" questions as pure OOP design questions is that I'd like special perspective from people who have experience with this kind of domain (languages & automata).

Any help is greatly appreciated.

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3 Answers

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more generally, should classes which differ only a little in the domain model, and only in terms of behavior, be represented via inheritance in the implementation, ...

Behavior is not "only". Behavior is most important part of objects.

or is it better to simply push different kinds of behavior into the parent class?

Certainly not. That would be violation of Liskov substitution principle.
Inheritance should not be used for "easier access to common stuff".

Content of parent class muss be completely ubiquitous with child classes, avoid inheritance and use composition if child does not comply w/ it.

more generally, should very simple classes in the domain model be given their own classes in the implementation - e.g. for extensibility - or should that be pushed into the container class?

It kind a depends on how "deep" Your logic is going to go.

Usually it's a good idea to start decomposition only when you hit some limits.
Some people call it evolutionary design.

E.g. - I have "class must not be larger than ~200 lines of code", "object must not talk with more than 5-7 other objects", "method should not be larger than ~10 lines of code", "same logic should be written once only" etc...

Also - it's easy to underestimate semantics. if order.isOverdue() is much more easily readable and understandable than if order.dueDate<date.Now(). Introducing classes that reflect concepts of domain greatly "humanizes" code - increases abstraction level (think "asm vs java").

But decomposition for the sake of decomposition leads to unnecessary complexity.
It always must be justified.

Should Transition be its own class in the implementation and, if so, will I need to subclass it in order to support each kind of automaton (since, besides differing in terms of the state, they also differ in terms of what happens during transitions)?

There is nothing wrong with that as long as it complies with Your domain.

Creation of abstractions is artistic activity that highly depends on Your domain (e.g. advises from experts at formal languages & automata might be severely over-complicated if requirement that Your code is supposed to be as a teaching tool for a course is forgotten).

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+1 for a good answer. I'm interested to see what others think, but barring something out of the ordinary, I'll probably accept this in fairly short order. –  Patrick87 Aug 2 '11 at 16:42
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Good Idea. Done similar stuff, first with Procedural programming, first, O.O., later.

Answer 1: Both. Some grammars or tokens will have a specific methods or attributes, while other should be shared among all grammars.

Answer 2: They should have their own classes, altought may share common ancestors.

Answer 3: It can be handled both ways, altought defining a specific class could be useful. I agree that intersection or association between other classes / objects exists, but, they are difficult to model. The "proxy" design pattern is an example of that.

Teaching language design with LEX, Bison, yacc are difficult. I "heard" that ANTLR is a good designing tool for teaching compiler related stuff.

What do you want to do ?

A object oriented parser / scanner ?

There are some already, I have trouble understanding how to use them. Some of them declare new grammars like defining new classes, but, in this case, I find functional programming (syntax) or logical programming (syntax) more suitable for declaring rules.

Visual related tools:

http://www.ust-solutions.com/ultragram.aspx

http://www.sand-stone.com/

http://antlr.org/

http://antlr.org/works/index.html

Good Luck ;-)

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I'm envisioning this as sort of a graphical tool to help students visualize algorithms on grammars and automata (e.g., DFA minimization, NFA-Lambda to DFA via subset construction, CFG to PDA via top-down parser, machines accepting strings, etc.) I don't think that competing with LEX, Bison, yacc and ANTLR is something that I want to try to achieve with this project! Really, just giving students a way to define these things, check their understanding on their own, see the algorithms working... that would be cool. If you know of anything like that, please, let me know! –  Patrick87 Aug 2 '11 at 15:21
    
Check the links. I remember seen a tool where "raildoard diagrams" en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Railroad_Diagram where used as a visual tool. But, couldn't find the link –  umlcat Aug 2 '11 at 15:32
    
Thanks for the links, though I'm not sure those are what I'm looking for. I'm really looking for something where students can, for instance, graphically (or, initially, textually) define an NFA, click a button and be shown how to produce an equivalent DFA. Or give a regular expression, click a button, and be shown how to construct an NFA recognizing the language it describes. Or define a Turing machine and test it out on a few strings to see what the TM does. Etc. –  Patrick87 Aug 2 '11 at 15:42
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If you want to go with an existing solution instead of writing one, some friends of mine at NCSU wrote a tool called ProofChecker that might fit the bill.

It's written in Java, so that might satisfy your OO angle as well.

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+1 for a very pertinent link. Will definitely be checking this out, and if possible, may try to work on extending/mimicking this in a larger framework. Do your friends have any plans to take this to more complicated levels of the Chomsky hierarchy? Thanks for the good lead! –  Patrick87 Aug 2 '11 at 21:09
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