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How do you end a long running Lua script?

I have two threads, one runs the main program and the other controls a user supplied Lua script. I need to kill the thread that's running Lua, but first I need the script to exit.

Is there a way to force a script to exit?

I have read that the suggested approach is to return a Lua exception. However, it's not garanteed that the user's script will ever call an api function ( it could be in a tight busy loop). Further, the user could prevent errors from causing his script to exit by using a pcall.

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8 Answers 8

up vote 13 down vote accepted
+400

You could use setjmp and longjump, just like the Lua library does internally. That will get you out of pcalls and stuff just fine without need to continuously error, preventing the script from attempting to handle your bogus errors and still getting you out of execution. (I have no idea how well this plays with threads though.)

#include <stdio.h>
#include <setjmp.h>
#include "lua.h"
#include "lualib.h"
#include "lauxlib.h"

jmp_buf place;

void hook(lua_State* L, lua_Debug *ar)
{
    static int countdown = 10;
    if (countdown > 0)
    {
        --countdown;
        printf("countdown: %d!\n", countdown);
    }
    else
    {
        longjmp(place, 1);
    }
}

int main(int argc, const char *argv[])
{
    lua_State* L = luaL_newstate();
    luaL_openlibs(L);
    lua_sethook(L, hook, LUA_MASKCOUNT, 100);

    if (setjmp(place) == 0)
        luaL_dostring(L, "function test() pcall(test) print 'recursing' end pcall(test)");

    lua_close(L);
    printf("Done!");
    return 0;
}
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1  
This is the solution I used. I'm still a little worried that Lua might be leaking something, but It's good enough for now. –  deft_code Aug 22 '11 at 14:09

You could set a variable somewhere in your program and call it something like forceQuitLuaScript. Then, you use a hook, described here to run every n instructions. After n instructions, it'll run your hook which just checks if forceQuitLuaScript is set, and if it is do any clean up you need to do and kill the thread.

Edit: Here's a cheap example of how it could work, only this is single threaded. This is just to illustrate how you might handle pcall and such:

#include <stdlib.h>
#include "lauxlib.h"

void hook(lua_State* L, lua_Debug *ar)
{
    static int countdown = 10;
    if (countdown > 0)
    {
        --countdown;
        printf("countdown: %d!\n", countdown);
    }
    else
    {
        // From now on, as soon as a line is executed, error
        // keep erroring until you're script reaches the top
        lua_sethook(L, hook, LUA_MASKLINE, 0); 
        luaL_error(L, "");
    }
}

int main(int argc, const char *argv[])
{
    lua_State* L = luaL_newstate();
    luaL_openlibs(L);
    lua_sethook(L, hook, LUA_MASKCOUNT, 100);
    // Infinitely recurse into pcalls
    luaL_dostring(L, "function test() pcall(test) print 'recursing' end pcall(test)");
    lua_close(L);
    printf("Done!");
    return 0;
}
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I think the part that I was missing was to have the hook function continually return an error once I decide the script needs to die. –  deft_code Aug 16 '11 at 18:30
1  
Actually, I think have a better solution. I'll post it in a different answer so this one can stay up. –  Alex Aug 16 '11 at 19:06

The way to end a script is to raise an error by calling error. However, if the user has called the script via pcall then this error will be caught.

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I would like to provide the user's script with the pcall function, so that they can use exceptions internally. Is there a work around? An uncatchable error maybe? –  deft_code Aug 15 '11 at 18:57
2  
@deft_code: there are no uncatchable errors in Lua if you use pcall. However, you can redefine pcall to catch a particular error value that you use to exit scripts and pass anything along otherwise. –  lhf Aug 15 '11 at 23:52
    
@lhf: That's a very nice suggestion, to redefine pcall()! –  Niccolo M. Sep 1 '13 at 5:58

It seems like you could terminate the thread externally (from your main thread) since the lua script is user supplied and you can't signal it to exit.

If that isn't an option, you could try the debug API. You could use lua_sethook to enable you to regain control assuming you have a way to gracefully terminate your thread in the hook.

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I cannot gracefully exit my thread unless the script exits. In particular, I need the the thread to unwind its stack after the lua_pcall returns. See C++0x thread interruption for why I can't just kill the thread. –  deft_code Aug 2 '11 at 21:47

I haven't found a way to cleanly kill a thread that is executing a long running lua script without relying on some intervention from the script itself. Here are some approaches I have taken in the past:

  1. If the script is long running it is most likely in some loop. The script can check the value of some global variable on each iteration. By setting this variable from outside of the script you can then terminate the thread.
  2. You can start the thread by using lua_resume. The script can then exit by using yield().
  3. You could provide your own implementation of pcall that checks for a specific type of error. The script could then call error() with a custom error type that your version of pcall could watch for:

    function()
        local there_is_an_error = do_something()
        if (there_is_an_error) then
            error({code = 900, msg = "Custom error"})
        end
    end
    
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If you're using coroutines to start the threads, you could maybe use coroutine.yield() to stop it.

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What if the user's script is in a coroutine when I try to yield? I think the users coroutine would return rather than the global script in that case. –  deft_code Aug 15 '11 at 18:59

possibly useless, but in the lua I use (luaplayer or PGELua), I exit with

os.exit() 

or

pge.exit()
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session:destroy();

Use this single line code on that where you are want to destroy lua script.

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