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I'm using asp.net to add add a client side onclick event to a span tag in a ListView:

<span id="mySpan" onclick="<%# Request.Cookies["myCookie"] != null ? "MyFunction1(" + Eval("MyVal1") + ");" : "MyFunction2(" + Eval("MyVal2") + ");" %>"

Every aspect of what I'm doing always works perfectly in Chrome and FF 100% of the time. In IE (v8 and v9), it always adds the correct javascript function and all of the code looks perfect - the rendered span code in IE looks identical to how it looks in Chrome and FF. However, when monitoring traffic with Fiddler, several random IE spans don't trigger the javascript function at all. Some do. There is no difference in the code between ones that work and ones that do not work. The ones that don't work in IE work fine in Chrome and FF. I am also able to confirm the javascript function isn't being fired by using means other than Fiddler, so Fiddler isn't giving me false readings.

Is there something I'm doing in my asp code to add the function that may be screwing this up in IE?

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It sounds like the problem is occurring client-side. Can you provide an example of the HTML tag that gets produced? Or better yet, a working jsfiddle that reflects the behavior you're describing? –  StriplingWarrior Aug 2 '11 at 15:18
    
here is an example of the rendered code that is not working: <span id="mySpan" onclick="MyFunction1(257, 1)">Text</span> (i've tried adding a trailing ; and a return to the function, both didn't work, as I expected). The code that does work looks exactly the same. The Fiddler response looks as it should when it works, but there is no action registered in Fiddler at all when it doesn't work. The event simply never gets fired. –  GoatBreeder Aug 2 '11 at 15:38
    
If you change the onclick to alert('hi');, does it have the same behavior? –  StriplingWarrior Aug 2 '11 at 15:52
    
alert('hi'); works correctly. it must be an issue with the dynamic generation... just not sure what. or why its so random. –  GoatBreeder Aug 2 '11 at 16:29
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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I'm guessing this is a problem with the javascript functions you're running. Try putting alert messages at various points in Function1's execution to figure out where it is breaking. You probably have javascript code that isn't cross-browser compatible, but which only gets hit for certain elements.

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i forgot to mention that the javascript function was calling a generic handler, which is what i was monitoring in fiddler. this made my description misleading and i apologize. the issue was that in my real code, i am passing 2 params to the function, and i did not have a 2nd overload for the function to handle the 2nd param and it was silently erroring. still very, very strange that it still seemed to work about 50% of the time in IE. it seems like it should be all or nothing. –  GoatBreeder Aug 2 '11 at 16:51
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It probably doesn't like that hash # in there and is commenting out the JS code.

Try placing it in a script tag:

<span id="mySpan">

<script type="text/javascript">
    document.getElementById("mySpan").addEventListener("click",function(){
    <% if(Request.Cookies["myCookie"] != null)
       {
    %>
           MyFunction1(MyVal1);
    <%
       }
       else
       {
    %>
           MyFunction2(MyVal2);
    <%
       }
    %>
    }
</script>

I apologize if my ASP syntax is off. I haven't coded it in years but hopefully you'll get the idea. Any ASP coders please feel free to fix this code for me ;)

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the # is actually required and is not rendered. –  GoatBreeder Aug 2 '11 at 15:32
    
Are you putting it past IE to not do something stupid? ;) –  Maverick Aug 2 '11 at 15:51
    
No. I wish they would just stop making IE. I couldn't possibly be any more serious about that. –  GoatBreeder Aug 2 '11 at 16:26
    
The # is part of the server tag, and is evaluated on the server side. It shouldn't be visible on the client side at all. Specifically, <%# %> is for binding expressions. –  Justin Morgan Aug 2 '11 at 16:43
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