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i don't get the full grasp on python iterators, i got an object with a list of children, and i want to iterate through this structure. I want to get the same behaviour as with the printall function but with an iterator.

    class t:
            def __init__(self, i):
                    self.l = []
                    self.a = 0
                    for ii in range(i):
                            self.a = ii
                            self.l.append(t(i-1))

            def __iter__(self):
                    return self

            def next(self):
                    for i in self.l:
                            yield i.__iter__()
                    yield self

            def printall(self):
                    for i in self.l:
                            i.printall()
                    print self.a

hope thats enough information, thanks

edit:

i just want to be able to iterate through all the leafs of the tree and do something with the object, i.e. when i have an instance

    bla = t(3) 

i want to be able to go through every node with

    for x in bla:
            print x.a

for example. i want to be able to something with each x, i just have to access every child once

share|improve this question
    
no, it's not enough. What do you want to see? –  Jochen Ritzel Aug 2 '11 at 15:52

3 Answers 3

up vote 10 down vote accepted

It sounds like you want the iterator to act as a tree traversal. Study the itertools module and you can really go places.

from itertools import chain, imap

class t:
  def __init__(self, value):
    self.value = value
    self.children = []
  def __iter__(self):
    "implement the iterator protocol"
    for v in chain(*imap(iter, self.children)):
      yield v
    yield self.value

root = t(0)
root.children.append(t(1))
root.children.append(t(2))
root.children[1].children.append(t(3))
print list(iter(root))   # -> [1, 3, 2, 0]
print list(iter(root.children[1]))  # -> [3, 2]

EDIT: Below is the originally accepted implementation. It has a performance problem; I would remove it, but it seems wrong to remove content that was an accepted answer. It will fully traverse the entire structure, creating O(N*log[M](N)) generator objects (for a balanced tree with branching factor M containing N total elements), before yielding any values. But it does produce the desired result with a simple expression.

(The above implementation visits areas of the tree on demand and has only O(M+log[M](N)) generator objects in memory at a time. In both implementations, only O(log[M](N)) levels of nested generators are expected.)

from itertools import chain

def isingle(item):
  "iterator that yields only a single value then stops, for chaining"
  yield item

class t:
  # copy __init__ from above
  def __iter__(self):
    "implement the iterator protocol"
    return chain(*(map(iter, self.children) + [isingle(self.value)]))
share|improve this answer
    
with chain i really can go places :) thanks –  Xtroce Aug 2 '11 at 16:41
1  
why unicode docstrings? including non-ascii in the docstring would be in violation of pep-8 anyway... –  SingleNegationElimination Aug 2 '11 at 17:58
    
@TokenMacGuy unicode not str seems more naturally the correct type to me for docstrings in Python 2. –  wberry Jun 25 '13 at 14:37
    
Is there any advantage of using proposed isingle generator instead of single element tuple or other basic sequence? Why not chain((self.value,), *map(iter, self.children))? –  Dariusz Walczak Sep 21 '13 at 19:07
    
No compelling reason to use isingle, it's just to illustrate the behavior of chain in explicit terms. I wonder now which is faster. –  wberry Sep 22 '13 at 21:10

From the code you have posted, it's clear that what you are missing is what a generator does, and how __iter__ and next are supposed to behave

So let's start with the iterator protocol. an object is iterable if it returns an iterator when its __iter__ method is called, and an iterator is an object that has a next method, which can be called zero or more times and should eventually raise StopIteration.

It's not to unusual for certain kinds of objects to be their own iterators (that have __iter__ return self), but this is usually limited to objects that somehow themselves represent a position inside something. For instance, the builtin file object is its own iterator, because files have an intrinsic seek position (which you can manipulate with file.seek() and file.tell()). Other objects, which represent the totality of a collection, like list, return something other than themselves.

So, your tree really more sounds like the latter rather than the former; It doesn't have a position attribute that represents which node it is on; it's all nodes at the same time, so it probably shouldn't have a next() method; __iter__ needs to return something else.

Which gets us to generators. When a normal function contains a yield statement, it is automatically not a function at all, it's a generator. The difference is that when you call a function, it's body is executed (and possibly returns a value). When you call a generator, it returns immedately, without executing the body at all; instead you get an iterator! when you iterate over that, the function body gets called; advancing to the next yield each time until it finally returns.

So, putting it all together,

class t:
    def __init__(self):
        self.l = []
        self.a = 0

    def __iter__(self):
        # first, yield everthing every one of the child nodes would yield.
        for child in self.l:
            for item in child:
                # the two for loops is because there's multiple children, and we need to iterate
                # over each one.
                yield item

        # finally, yield self
        yield self

But, since what we're doing is iterating a sequence of iterators (and also one more thing, self), itertools.chain as in the accepted answer, really makes a lot of sense.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 Good explanation of the mechanics. –  wberry Aug 2 '11 at 18:36
    
thanks for the explanation it really makes clear what i got wrong with the iterators. now also the technical side behind iterators is much clearer to me, so thanks again ^^ –  Xtroce Aug 4 '11 at 14:00

My first suggestion is to change the name of your class with a more clear one following the PEP-8. It was a bit hard to manage a class name such as t:

class Tree:
    def __init__(self, i):
        self.l = []
        self.a = 0
        for ii in range(i):
            self.a = ii
            self.l.append(Tree(i-1))

Now, you should change the __iter__() method to return the next element in self, not self itself - no pun intended :) The __iter__() method should return an iterator to the original object, not the object itself:

def __iter__(self):
    return next(self)

Now comes the hard part: the next() method. I always find it hard to write a recursive iterators but this is not that impossible: for each child, iterate over it and yield the iterated value:

def next(self):
    for i in self.l:
        for ii in i:
            yield ii
    yield self

Since the method is recursive, it takes care of yielding all descendants. When the next() method is called at a leaf node (a node without children) it will just return the node itself. OTOH, when called on a node with children, it will call itself for each children and yield the returned value. This means that it will be called by the children of the children and so on until the leaf nodes. After being called by all descendants of a node - which means that all descendants were yielded -, it should yield its own value, so you have to yield the original node itself.

Now your printall() function should work flawlessly:

if __name__ == "__main__":
t = Tree(6)
t.printall()

Some final considerations:

  • Always make your classes extend the object:

    class Tree(object)::

  • I bet you want to write a __init__() method like the one below:

    def __init__(self, i):
        self.l = []
        self.a = i
        for ii in range(i):
            self.l.append(Tree(i-1))
    
  • The wberry solution is better because it is more concise and, probably, more efficient. However, I think the OP is studying trees, recursion etc. so I thought a more hardcoded solution would be instructive :)

share|improve this answer
1  
+1 Good explanation of the mechanics. –  wberry Aug 2 '11 at 18:34

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