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I want to calculate the total number of nodes between a start node and and end node in a System.Collections.Generic.LinkedList, similar to the STL algorithm std::count in C++ (except that I intend to include the end node in the count).

I have not been able to figure out e.g. how to use any LINQ extension methods to efficiently calculate this number, so I have implemented a counter like this (excluding all null and consistency checks):

var counter = 1;
var node = iStartNode;
while (!ReferenceEquals(node, iEndNode))
{
  node = node.Next;
  ++counter;
}

But there must be a more efficient solution, mustn't there? Any suggestions are highly appreciated.

share|improve this question
    
Why do you think there should be a more efficient solution? – Jon Skeet Aug 2 '11 at 16:45
    
I maybe should have used the word compact instead of efficient. From a performance point of view maybe the above solution is OK? – Anders Gustafsson Aug 2 '11 at 16:50
    
From a performance point of view, it's fine. See my answer for a more compact representation if you're happy to have a couple of extension methods which may be helpful elsewhere too. – Jon Skeet Aug 2 '11 at 16:53
up vote 6 down vote accepted

I believe your solution to be the most efficient and also the most readable. Even if you can find an implementation in LINQ it will surely be tortuous.

By excluding null checks I presume you mean that the real code doesn't throw in the event of node running off the end of the list.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks David for your answer. Actually, I have implemented my method so that it does throw when running off the end of the list, but in a controlled way. I verify that both the start and end nodes are contained in the same linked list, and that the start node appears before the end node. But that's maybe a different story... – Anders Gustafsson Aug 2 '11 at 16:55

The only way I can think of which might be slightly cleaner - or at least, make general code working with linked list nodes slightly cleaner - would be to write two extension methods:

static IEnumerable<LinkedListNode<T>> AsEnumerable<T>
    (this LinkedListNode<T> node)
{
    // Can even call list.Head.AsEnumerable() when the list is empty!
    while (node != null)
    {
        yield return node;
        node = node.Next;
    }
}

static IEnumerable<LinkedListNode<T>> ReverseEnumerable<T>
    (this LinkedListNode<T> node)
{
    while (node != null)
    {
        yield return node;
        node = node.Previous;
    }
}

Then you could use LINQ:

var count = node.AsEnumerable().TakeWhile(x => x != endNode).Count();

That wouldn't include endNode itself, so you might want to increment it by 1. (It would be nice to have TakeUntil and SkipUntil methods which were like TakeWhile and SkipWhile, but included the first predicate-non-matching node as the final one to take or skip.)

Note that this wouldn't go bang if it failed to find endNode - it would just give the count of the list from the start node onwards.

The nice thing about the extension methods is they basically let you operate on the list as a sequence from any point.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Jon for this interesting answer. I cannot see that you actually use the ReverseEnumerable method, have you included it only for completeness? I definitely agree with your comment on TakeUntil/SkipUntil methods; I was initially searching for something similar in the framework, but since I couldn't find anything I reverted to the solution that I have outlined above. – Anders Gustafsson Aug 2 '11 at 17:04
    
@Anders: Absolutely. Given that you've got a doubly-linked list, I wouldn't put in the first extension method without the second :) – Jon Skeet Aug 2 '11 at 17:05
    
+1 for one of the least "tortuous" Linq queries that I have seen! ;-) – David Heffernan Aug 2 '11 at 17:15
    
@Anders: It's easy enough to write your own TakeUntil method if you want it of course :) – Jon Skeet Aug 2 '11 at 17:26
    
@Jon: We'll see; if my LinkedList needs expand I might just do that :-) Thanks for your kind help. – Anders Gustafsson Aug 2 '11 at 17:32

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