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What is considered the best practice for laying out forms in html? Specifically where you have a set of fields with labels, and possible error indicators. The best I can do is use a table, but that doesn't work real well in a css oriented layout design. For example:

<table>
  <tr>
    <td>Name:</td>
    <td><input type="text" /></td>
    <td style="display: none" id="NameError">*</td>
  </tr>
  <tr>
    <td>Phone:</td>
    <td><input type="text" /></td>
    <td style="display: none" id="PhoneError">*</td>
  </tr>
  <tr>
    <td>Birthday:</td>
    <td><input type="text" /></td>
    <td style="display: none" id="BirthdayError">*</td>
  </tr>
</table>

This doesn't seem very CSS, but I am not sure how to use a css oriented layout to make this work right.

What would be considered best practice?

share|improve this question
    
@WTP - strictly speaking, <dl> is a definition list (a list of items and definitions for them) so not particularly appropriate, IMO - however, I have seen them used in this way. –  David Precious Aug 2 '11 at 16:50

6 Answers 6

I don't know about you guys, but I don't use much markup for form layout.

Here is the markup for a simple log in form (no layout markup i.e. divs, tables, etc)

<form method="post">
    <label>Username</label>
    <input type="text" name="username" />

    <label>Password</label>
    <input type="password" name="password" />

    <input type="submit" name="Log In" />
</form>

Here is CSS for the form

label,input{float:left}
label,input[type="submit"]{clear:left}

Here is the result

The rendered result of the above HTML and CSS

The amazing thing about this is:

  • Lack of markup
  • Lack of CSS
  • Flexibility

If you look at the css, the label element is being cleared left (and floated left). Meaning that the label will float with its fellow inputs however every label will be a new line.

This makes it VERY EASY to add extra inputs. Even validation messages after inputs

Take this form for example

<form method="post">
    <label>Name</label>
    <input type="text" name="username" />

    <label>Password</label>
    <input type="password" name="password" />

    <label><abbr title="Date of Birth">D.O.B.</abbr></label>
    <input type="text" name="dob_day" />
    <input type="text" name="dob_month" />
    <input type="text" name="dob_year" />

    <input type="submit" name="Log In" />
</form>

With this CSS

label,input{float:left}
label,input[type="submit"]{clear:left}
input[name^="dob_"]{width:44px;margin:2px}
label{width:70px}

We get

The rendered result of the above HTML and CSS

It really is that simple :)

Using this concept, you create a huge number of possibilities, and you'll never have to use a table for layout again!

SAY NO TO TABLE LAYOUTS FOR EVER! WOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO

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Posting my answer to your follow up question here as it is likely to get closed as a duplicate.

I'm not sure how good the browser support on this is, tested in FF4: http://jsfiddle.net/shanethehat/7h3bC/11/

<div id="tableForm">
    <div class="tableRow">
        <div class="tableCell">
            <label for="mycheckbox">  Tick me if you dare</label>
        </div>
        <div class="tableCell">
            <input type="checkbox" name="mycheckbox" id="mycheckbox">
        </div>
    </div>
    <div class="tableRow">
        <div class="tableCell">
            <label for="mytext">  Give me some text test test</label>
        </div>
        <div class="tableCell">
            <input type="text" name="mytext" id="mytext">
        </div>
    </div>
</div>


div#tableForm {
 display:table;   
}
div.tableRow {
  display:table-row;  
}
div.tableCell {
    display:table-cell;   
    width:inherit;
}

Yes, I know, I've just created a table using divs. The point though is that this is nicely accessible and semantically proper.

Edit: fails miserably in IE7 where fixed width would be the only way, but 8 and 9 seem OK.

Edit2: switched the label/fields around and set right align: http://jsfiddle.net/shanethehat/7h3bC/12/. The markup is getting a little class heavy at this point. :first-child would be an alternative to using the left class, but at the expense of IE8.

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One can argue a form is tabular data, so a table is acceptable. As David states, they main issue is that you want to use proper LABEL tags.

In your example, I'm not sure what you gain from using a table over CSS, though.

share|improve this answer
    
devil's advocate says that by using a table instead of CSS, he gets a more "robust" layout in terms of deploying the same markup to multiple websites that might each have their own different preferred widths for the "columns". Using divs and floats tends to require that you give specified widths if you want the same kind of robust non-tables layout.... I always find myself tweaking CSS to match each particular site, never just a general "one size fits all" solution sadly... –  Funka Aug 2 '11 at 23:54
    
ha...oops. I meant to say "not sure what you gain from using CSS over a table". At least with the example given, I'd say a table makes the most sense. –  DA. Aug 3 '11 at 1:13

Best Practice = NEVER use table for layout.

You can try CSS framework like blueprint our 960 grid system.

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2  
... unless you are displaying tabular data, in which case it is ALWAYS appropriate to use a <table> as a structuring option. Although you should avoid using <table> tags for hacking a layout, there is nothing wrong with using HTML tags the way they were intended. Presenting tabular data in a <table> does NOT violate the separation of structure and style; you are telling the consumer, "This is structured tabular data!" –  Boris Nikolaevich Aug 2 '11 at 16:54
1  
Yes. I agree. That is why i said for layout ;-) in term of general layout. –  Cygnusx1 Aug 2 '11 at 16:57
    
We're on the same page--I was just expanding your answer, not disagreeing with it. –  Boris Nikolaevich Aug 2 '11 at 17:01

Use actual <label> elements for field labels, which is good for usability too, and style them appropriately using CSS.

For instance,

<label for="name">Name</label> <input type="text" name="name">

Then in your CSS, you could style LABEL elements with, e.g., display:block and a width of your desire, and appropriate clear values.

For tickbox / radio inputs, the input itself should be inside the <label> element - this means that the label itself should be clickable to select that input, for instance:

<label for="mycheckbox"> <input type="checkbox" name="mycheckbox"> Tick me if you dare</label>

share|improve this answer
1  
Could you be a little more specific? I don't want to set an explicit width on the labels, I want the controls to take up however much space they need, and then have the labels take up the rest of the space, much as they would do in the table layout above. For example: jsfiddle.net/roger_davis/7h3bC looks like hell. –  Roger Davis Aug 2 '11 at 18:10

"Best Practice" would be to use a table for what it's meant to do (represent data) and use a combination of div, span or other elements to style your input form.

share|improve this answer
    
Can you provide a sample of doing so? I'm trying to avoid using tables for this, but all the smart people here don't seem to be able to come up with a working solution that is reasonably robust. As a second data point, pretty much all the big web sites I looked at take the approach of either a table or a fixed width column, neither of which is ideal. –  Roger Davis Aug 3 '11 at 1:56
    
@Roger: here is a good example of using divs for a form: secure.blippy.com/signup –  Brad Christie Aug 3 '11 at 13:52
    
@Brad Christie: your example uses fixed width columns. –  Russell Silva Aug 25 '11 at 22:08

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