Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Hello Developers! I am learning algorithms from Algorithms Design Manual Book by Skiena. There I have the following code:

    #include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

typedef int item_type;

typedef struct{
    item_type item;
    struct list* next;
    }list;

void insert_list(list **l, item_type x){
    list *p;
    p = malloc(sizeof(list));
    p->item = x;
    p->next = *l;
    *l = p;
    }

int main(){
    return 0;
    }

It gives me Warning when compiled:

gcc -Wall -o "test" "test.c" (in directory: /home/akacoder/Desktop/Algorithm_Design_Manual/chapter2) test.c: In function ‘insert_list’: test.c:15: warning: assignment from incompatible pointer type Compilation finished successfully.

But when I rewrite this code as C++:

 #include <iostream>
#include <cstdio>
#include <cstdlib>
using namespace std;

typedef int item_type;

typedef struct{
    item_type item;
    struct list* next;
    }list;

void insert_list(list **l, item_type x){
    list *p;
    p = malloc(sizeof(list));
    p->item = x;
    p->next = *l;
    *l = p;
    }

int main(){
    return 0;
    }

It gives the following:

g++ -Wall -o "chapter2" "chapter2.cpp" (in directory: /home/akacoder/Desktop/Algorithm_Design_Manual/chapter2) chapter2.cpp:15: error: conflicting declaration ‘typedef struct list list’ chapter2.cpp:14: error: ‘struct list’ has a previous declaration as ‘struct list’ chapter2.cpp: In function ‘void insert_list(list**, item_type)’: chapter2.cpp: In function ‘void insert_list(list**, item_type)’: chapter2.cpp:19: error: invalid conversion from ‘void*’ to ‘list*’

Can anyone explain why it is so? And How can I rewrite it in C++?

share|improve this question

8 Answers 8

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Your problem in both cases is in the struct definition: struct list *next doesn't refer to the struct you are in the process of declaring. Try this instead:

typedef struct list {
    item_type item;
    struct list* next;
} list;

In addition, in C++ you must cast the void * returned by malloc to the appropriate pointer type (list *), C++ is stricter about these things. Also, BTW, in C++ you can leave off the typedef completely if you want.

The reason for the differing error messages is a difference in the languages.

In C, the compiler knows that struct list * is a pointer to a struct, so it doesn't need to complain that it doesn't actually know what a "struct list" is yet. Later, though, when you try to assign this "struct list *" from a pointer of type "list *" (the type of which is "pointer to an anonymous struct"), it complains about the mismatch.

In C++, a "struct" declaration is more or less equivalent to a "class" declaration (the major difference is in the default visibility of members). Among other things, this means that structs in C++ are more or less automatically typedefed. So when the compiler sees "struct list *next", it takes it as a forward declaration of a class named "list"; then when it finishes the statement and processes the typedef, throws an error because you're trying to typedef something to an identifier that is already (forward-)declared as something else. Then it issues further errors because it doesn't actually know what "list" might be, due to the earlier error.

share|improve this answer
    
it doesn't have to have previous declaration, it interprets struct list *next as forward declaration. –  Gene Bushuyev Aug 2 '11 at 17:10
    
@GeneBushuyev: Good point, I've adjusted the wording. –  Anomie Aug 2 '11 at 17:22

This is because c++ is stricter than c with respect to type conversions.

There are host of other errors in your code. Please note that just putting a c source code, renaming the file as .cpp & compiling using g++ does not make a c source code as c++.

If you are writing a program in c++ please use new & not malloc, doing so you do not need to explicitly type cast as in case of malloc.

share|improve this answer
    
And what may I attribute the downvote to? –  Alok Save Aug 2 '11 at 17:05
1  
This answer needs to be more specific: "There are host of other errors in your code" doesn't help anyone. –  Chris Johnson Aug 2 '11 at 17:06
2  
@Chris Johnson: By the time i finished writing the main erroneous part, other answers already came up with the elaborated list of errors, I don't think its worthwhile to repeat the same here, the answer, answered the basic flaw & the point I wanted to make. –  Alok Save Aug 2 '11 at 17:10

C++ does not allow arbitrary pointer conversions, while C does. But since this is not considered good style, the compiler emits a warning.

Just add a cast and it will solve both messages:

p = (list*)malloc(sizeof(list));

Or if you want to be C++ only:

p = new list;

But then, you should declare constructors and such, also.

share|improve this answer
    
Casting the result of malloc() is considered poor style in C. It can mask errors; for example, if you forget the #include <stdlib.h>, some compilers will assume that malloc() returns an int. An idiom that avoids type mismatches is: p = malloc(sizeof *p);. –  Keith Thompson Aug 2 '11 at 18:21
    
And if you're trying to write code that will compile either as C or as C++, you're probably doing it wrong. C/C++ interoperability is good enough that there's rarely a good reason to do this. –  Keith Thompson Aug 2 '11 at 18:22

This is explained in this link.

Quote:

Gotcha for a C++ programmer using C

Structs and Enums

You have to include the struct keyword before the name of the struct type to declare a struct: In C++, you could do this

struct a_struct { int x; };

a_struct struct_instance;

and have a new instance of a_struct called struct_instance. In C, however, we have to include the struct keyword when declaring struct_instance:

struct a_struct struct_instance;

In fact, a similar situation also holds for declaring enums: in C, you must include the keyword enum; in C++, you don't have to. As a side note, most C programmers get around this issue by using typedefs:

typedef struct struct_name { /* variables */ } struct_name_t;

Now you can declare a struct with

struct_name_t struct_name_t_instance;

But there is another gotcha for C++ programmers: you must still use the "struct struct_name" syntax to declare a struct member that is a pointer to the struct.

typedef struct struct_name {
    struct struct_name instance;
    struct_name_t instance2; /* invalid!  The typedef isn't defined
yet */ } struct_name_t;
share|improve this answer

You need to change this class:

typedef struct{
    item_type item;
    struct list* next;
    }list;

to this:

struct list {
    item_type item;
    list* next;
    };

Explanation: in the first example, you have anonymous structure, inside which struct list is forward declared. So when compiler sees typedef on the next line it finds a name collision, because typedef is not the same as struct declaration in C++.

share|improve this answer
    
Not quite; in list* next; "list" is undeclared. (C++ lets you refer to "struct list" as "list"; C doesn't.) You want either struct list { item_type item; struct list *next; }; (and then refer to the type as "struct list") or typedef struct list { item_type item; struct list *next; } list;. –  Keith Thompson Aug 2 '11 at 18:24
    
@Keith -- list* next; is declared (compiler would have failed otherwise); inside class body all names (not only class name) are visible. What you probably wanted to say is that list is incomplete at that point, which is fine, it doesn't prevent compiler to take a pointer on incomplete type. –  Gene Bushuyev Aug 2 '11 at 18:29
    
In C++, the declaration of struct list, even as an incomplete type, does let you refer to the type as list. In C, it doesn't -- which is why C code commonly uses typedefs for struct types. (My own preference is to omit the typedef and just refer to the type as struct list.) –  Keith Thompson Aug 2 '11 at 19:28

Since what you're doing is really defining a struct and then creating an alias with the typedef I think it's more readable to do this in the C case:

typedef struct list_ {
    item_type item;
    struct list_* next;
} list;
share|improve this answer
    
Why do you use different identifiers for the tag (list_) and the typedef name (list)? Since struct tags are in a different namespace (in the C sense of the term), it's perfectly legal to write typedef struct list { ... } list;; then "struct list" and "list" are two different names for the same type. –  Keith Thompson Aug 2 '11 at 19:29
    
@Keith you're right, I guess I just prefer this style because it gives the impression that the user shouldn't make use of struct list_, but should go through the typedef, mainly for consistency. –  mgalgs Aug 2 '11 at 20:27

Use the following code

#include <iostream>
#include <cstdio>
#include <cstdlib>
using namespace std;

typedef int item_type;

struct list{
    item_type item;
    list* next;
};

void insert_list(list **l, item_type x){ 
    list *p; 
    p = (list*)malloc(sizeof(list));
    p->item = x;
    p->next = *l; 
    *l = p;
}

int main(){
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Why malloc? This is supposed to be C++ NOT C! –  Alok Save Aug 3 '11 at 4:53

What C only warns against, C++ is likely to consider an error.

It's a programming cultural thing. C was very forgiving in not enforcing it's typing system. C++ is still quite forgiving, but you're doing something in C that even C++ won't forgive.

When you malloc that block of memory, cast it to a pointer to a list. That will covert the address (pointer) to a pointer of the right type.

Without that cast, you could have malloc'd the size of anything, and there's no telling if it was meant to be referenced by a list pointer or some other pointer.

share|improve this answer
    
In C, casting the result of malloc() is more likely to create or conceal errors than to solve them. Just assign the result to your pointer object; the implicit conversion from void* to any pointer-to-object type will take care of the rest. Use p = malloc(sizeof *p); to ensure that all the sizes and types are consistent and correct. (This is specific to C; for C++, you probably shouldn't be using malloc() anyway.) –  Keith Thompson Aug 2 '11 at 18:26

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.