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*EDIT**
i tried it with && instead of || and now it does not come back as false for any file. I do think it needs to be && though.

I have a custom validation function that I am using to check if the file is an excel file. When i test is the last 4 characters are .xls OR the last 5 characters are .xlsx it works but when i check for both it does not. Any idea why it will not let me do this?

$.validator.addMethod("xlsxOrxls", function(value, element) {
    var isValid = true;
    var xlsx = value.substr(value.length - 5);
    var xls = value.substr(value.length - 4);
    if (xls != '.xls' || xlsx != '.xlsx') 
        isValid = false;
    return isValid;
}, "<br/><label style='color:red'><b>Not a valid file format.</b></label>"
);

If I comment out the var xlsx line and take out the "|| xlsx != '.xlsx'" part of the if statement it works and vice versa, but if i leave them both in there it will not work. I have even tried making them 2 separate functions but thats not working either.

Any idea why its not letting me do this?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Use regex instead!

$.validator.addMethod(
    "xlsxOrxls",
    function(value, element) {
        return value.match(/\.xlsx?$/);
    },
    "<br/><label style='color:red'><b>Not a valid file format.</b></label>"
);

Or, if you really want do do it your way:

$.validator.addMethod(
    "xlsxOrxls",
    function(value, element) {
        var xlsx = value.substr(value.length - 5);
        var xls = value.substr(value.length - 4);
        return xls == '.xls' || xlsx == '.xlsx';
    },
    "<br/><label style='color:red'><b>Not a valid file format.</b></label>"
);
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Thanks, i used the second way and it worked how i needed it to. Are there benefits to regex over "my way"? –  craigtb Aug 2 '11 at 18:32
    
It's shorter, and easier to read. You don't have to remember where substr counts from, etc. A more readable form would be value.match(/\.(xls|xslx|more|file|extensions|here)$/);. That would be much harder to write your way. –  Eric Aug 2 '11 at 18:34
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I think you are looking for &&, not ||. if the extension is different from .xls and its also different from .xlsx, then isValid is false.

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Yeah i tried && right after and now it doesnt show an error message for any file type. I made an edit to my above post. –  craigtb Aug 2 '11 at 18:24
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You've got mutually exclusive conditions, but you're trying to check both of them at once. If the last 5 characters is ".xlsx" then the last 4 will never be ".xls" and vice versa.

Check for one condition and if it doesn't pass, check the other.

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Thanks, i realized that "OR" wasnt the right way to go a little after i posted it –  craigtb Aug 2 '11 at 18:31
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