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I have created a simple form that creates two classes A and B. Class A kicks off a Thread that fires and event every second. Class B subscribes to this event and updates a label. Code looks something like this:

class A...

public delegate void MyEventHandler(string text);
public event MyEventHandler MyEvent;
...
int i = 0;
if(MyEvent != null)
  MyEvent(i.ToString());
i++;

class B...

public delegate void MyEventHandler(string text);
void IncomingEvent(string text)
{
  if(InvokeRequired)
    Invoke(new MyEventHandler(IncomingEvent), text);
  else
    label.Text = text;
}

This code seems to work just as expected until i try to close the form. When closing my Invoke line throw an InvalidOperationException. I assume this is because my form is disposed of prior to my last event going off. I obviously can catch this exception and tuck it under the rug like it never happened but i'm curious on what the correct way in handling this is. Thanks in advance for the help.

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Most InvalidOperationExceptions include a message describing what happened. Can you include the message? –  StriplingWarrior Aug 2 '11 at 18:29
    
Invoke or BeginInvoke cannot be called on a control until the window handle has been created. –  poco Aug 2 '11 at 18:31
    
possible duplicate of Avoid calling Invoke when the control is disposed –  Hans Passant Aug 2 '11 at 18:33

2 Answers 2

If it is indeed disposed, try the IsDisposed property. (Form extends Control)

public delegate void MyEventHandler(string text);
void IncomingEvent(string text)
{
  if(IsDisposed)
    return;
  if(InvokeRequired)
    Invoke(new MyEventHandler(IncomingEvent), text);
  else
    label.Text = text;
}
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So it seems as though this works, however looking at the answer above i would expect for it to work as well. However, it seems the above answer throws the same error i was getting before. I don't know that i really see the difference though... Before i say this is correct i want to be sure that i understand the difference –  poco Aug 2 '11 at 18:43
    
If I remember correctly, the Control.Invoke method in WinForms sends a windows message to the "window" for that control. When an control/form is disposed, its "window" is destroyed, so there's no "window" to send the message to. By checking if the form is disposed, you avoid the possibility of error. –  agent-j Aug 2 '11 at 18:48
    
I believe that to be correct sir, however i'm not sure why if(!IsDisposed && InvokeRequired) fails as they seem to be the same to me. The part that concerns me is if the events were really fast do i ever run the risk of passing the first if and failing the invoke like i am now if i happen to hit the close button at the right time. –  poco Aug 2 '11 at 18:59
    
(Ooops, w.brian's answer was below my question on the screen when I read your comment). That solution will set the text with the wrong thread when the form is disposed. if (IsDisposed(which is true) ... else Set label text with wrong thread and throw exception –  agent-j Aug 2 '11 at 19:34

Simply check if the form IsDisposed while you check InvokeRequired, and all should be well:

public delegate void MyEventHandler(string text);
void IncomingEvent(string text)
{
   if(!IsDisposed && InvokeRequired)
       Invoke(new MyEventHandler(IncomingEvent), text);
   else
       label.Text = text;
}
share|improve this answer
    
A true return from IsDisposed will imply that Invoke will fail, but a false return will not imply that Invoke will succeed. It is entirely possible for an object to get disposed between the IsDisposed check and the Invoke. –  supercat Aug 4 '11 at 22:38

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