Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I want to plot data, then create a new figure and plot data2, and finally come back to the original plot and plot data3, kinda like this:

import numpy as np
import matplotlib as plt

x = arange(5)
y = np.exp(5)
plt.figure()
plt.plot(x, y)

z = np.sin(x)
plt.figure()
plt.plot(x, z)

w = np.cos(x)
plt.figure("""first figure""") # Here's the part I need
plt.plot(x, w)

FYI How do I tell matplotlib that I am done with a plot? does something similar, but not quite! It doesn't let me get access to that original plot.

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 21 down vote accepted

If you find yourself doing things like this regularly it may be worth investigating the object-oriented interface to matplotlib. In your case:

import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
import numpy as np

x = np.arange(5)
y = np.exp(x)
fig1 = plt.figure()
ax1 = fig1.add_subplot(111)
ax1.plot(x, y)

z = np.sin(x)
fig2 = plt.figure()
ax2 = fig2.add_subplot(111)
ax2.plot(x, z)

w = np.cos(x)
ax1.plot(x, w) # can continue plotting on the first axis

It is a little more verbose but it's much clearer and easier to keep track of, especially with several figures each with multiple subplots.

share|improve this answer
2  
I prefer the object oriented approach as when I anticipate having many figures, it will be easier to keep track of them by using names rather than numbers. Thanks! –  Peter D Aug 4 '11 at 4:37

When you call figure, simply number the plot.

x = arange(5)
y = np.exp(5)
plt.figure(0)
plt.plot(x, y)

z = np.sin(x)
plt.figure(1)
plt.plot(x, z)

w = np.cos(x)
plt.figure(0) # Here's the part I need
plt.plot(x, w)

Edit: Note that you can number the plots however you want (here, starting from 0) but if you don't provide figure with a number at all when you create a new one, the automatic numbering will start at 1 ("Matlab Style" according to the docs).

share|improve this answer
    
This appears to work in matplotlib's interactive mode, while the figure() ... add_subplot() method does not. Thanks! –  chbrown Apr 2 at 22:02

However, numbering starts at 1, so:

x = arange(5)
y = np.exp(5)
plt.figure(1)
plt.plot(x, y)

z = np.sin(x)
plt.figure(2)
plt.plot(x, z)

w = np.cos(x)
plt.figure(1) # Here's the part I need, but numbering starts at 1!
plt.plot(x, w)

Also, if you have multiple axes on a figure, such as subplots, use the axes(h) command where h is the handle of the desired axes object to focus on that axes.

(don't have comment privileges yet, sorry for new answer!)

share|improve this answer
3  
0 works, automatic numbering just start at 1, if you don't give it a number at all. –  agf Aug 2 '11 at 19:26
    
@agf Ah. Noted. –  Ross B. Aug 2 '11 at 19:43

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.