Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

i have a string:

Recent overs</b> <tt>. . . . . . <b>|</b> 3 . . 1b 4 .<b>|</b> 1 1 1 . . 4 <b>|</b> . . . 4 . .</tt></p>

It is all in a single line, so how would I extract only the information about the balls, ie output should be . . . . . . 3 . . 1b 4 . 1 1 1 . . 4 . . . 4 . .

The closest i got was with [^(Recent overs|<b>|<tt>|</b>|</tt>|</p>)]+, but it matches the 1 and not 1b.

share|improve this question
    
Balls? What balls? What does that have to do with your question? –  Justin Morgan Aug 2 '11 at 19:26
1  
What Regex engine or language do you use? Also, within character class the alternation have no meaning... –  nEAnnam Aug 2 '11 at 19:28
    
Sample in ruby: x = 'Recent overs</b> <tt>. . . . . . <b>|</b> 3 . . 1b 4 .<b>|</b> 1 1 1 . . 4 <b>|</b> . . . 4 . .</tt></p>'; result = x.gsub(/<[^>]+>/, '').gsub('|', '').match(/\..*\./)[0] –  taro Aug 2 '11 at 19:33

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

First, the brackets [] are used for creating what is called a "character class" - this is meant to represent a single character. Your code effectively says don't match these characters: (Recntovrsbp|<>/

You'd be better off using a regex to remove the unwanted strings, then it's easier to parse the result, like this:

Javascript, because you didn't specify the language

var s = "Recent overs</b> <tt>. . . . . . <b>|</b> 3 . . 1b 4 .<b>|</b> 1 1 1 . . 4 <b>|</b> . . . 4 . .</tt></p>";
s = s.replace(/(Recent overs|<[^>]+>|\|)/ig, '');

jsfiddle example

The resulting 's' is much easier to parse.

share|improve this answer

Try \s[\d\.][\w]* to match all digit (possibly followed by word) characters or points preceeded by a space!

share|improve this answer
    
The first group of .'s doesn't have a space before it. –  Justin Morgan Aug 2 '11 at 19:35
    
Also, this will match overs in Recent overs. –  Justin Morgan Aug 2 '11 at 19:36
    
It works without the space too: [\d\.][\w]* –  Vlad Aug 2 '11 at 19:37
    
@Justin: I updated it to not match overs –  Vlad Aug 2 '11 at 19:38
    
But in either case, each data point will be in a separate match; i.e. each . will be a single match, each 1 will be a single match...each match will consist of one character, except for 1b. He seems to want them grouped together according to which tag pair they're in. –  Justin Morgan Aug 2 '11 at 19:42

Based solely on the example you gave, you could try something like:

/(?<>)[a-z\d\s\.]+/g

Alternative, in case your regex engine doesn't support lookbehinds:

/>([a-z\d\s\.]+)/g     #Matches will be in the first capture group.

However, it's a little hard to infer the rules of what should/should not be allowed based on the small sample you gave, and your output sample doesn't make much sense to me as a data structure. It seems like you might be better off using an HTML parser for this, since using regex to process HTML is frequently a bad idea.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.