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Basically something along the lines of:

switch (string.contains(x))
{
    case(x = "asdf"):
        break;
    case(x = "jkl"):
        break;
    case(x = "qwerty"):
        break;
}

edit: Sorry guys, what I'd ideally like is to have the switch statement check the string for several different values, and depending on which of the values it finds inside the string, execute the appropriate code.

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There are multiple problems there... for one, checking a boolean in a switch statement is... a bit silly as there are only two possible cases, and it has to be constant anyway. You are using the assignment operator = instead of the equality operator ==, thoigh I'm not sure why you would do either here, and you have no code in any of your case blocks. –  Ed S. Aug 2 '11 at 20:38
    
Can you explain what you want. It seems that no one understands you since you are not writing valid C#. –  agent-j Aug 2 '11 at 20:46
    
Sorry guys, what I'd ideally like is to have the switch statement check the string for several different values, and depending on which of the values it finds inside the string, execute the appropriate code. –  Rancur3p1c Aug 2 '11 at 23:12

5 Answers 5

You can't do this unfortunately, however you can apply "functional pattern matching". Read up here on how to do it:

http://codebetter.com/matthewpodwysocki/2008/09/16/functional-c-pattern-matching/

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The Contains(string s) method returns a boolean, so it is not permissible in the switch statement.

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You mean this, as far as I could figure it out:

if (string.Contains(x))
{
    switch (x)
    {
        case "asdf":
            break;
        case "jkl":
            break;
        case "qwerty":
            break;
    }
}
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+1 for translating op's original intent –  John Buchanan Aug 2 '11 at 20:43
    
No, because I want to execute several different things depending on which of those ("asdf" etc) the string contains. I would have to if/elseif the above code 3x changing the value of x each time. –  Rancur3p1c Aug 2 '11 at 23:10
    
So just turn this into a function, getting x as its argument and call the function three times with the various values you have. –  Shadow Wizard Aug 3 '11 at 6:27

The switch keyword has some magic (a lookup table), since it can never throw an exception.

You can rewrite it just as succinctly as:

if (x.Contains("asdf"))
{}
else if (x.Contains("jkl"))
{}
else if (x.Contains("qwerty"))
{}
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I hate if else. Makes it much harder to scan over code with eye IMO, and gets quite messy looking. I try to do everything with switch. –  Rancur3p1c Aug 2 '11 at 23:06

Have you tried this:

    switch (true)
    {
        case string.Contains("asdf"):
            break;
        case string.Contains("jkl"):
            break;
        case string.Contains("qwerty"):
            break;
    }
share|improve this answer
    
That's a really interesting idea. I will try this first thing tomorrow. –  Rancur3p1c Aug 2 '11 at 23:08
    
does not compile. "A constant value is expected" –  Shadow Wizard Aug 3 '11 at 6:25
1  
This concept does work for VB, but not for c#, just wanted to throw that out there. –  abend Oct 23 '12 at 1:59

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