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C++ array pointers algorithm

I have a problem with an algorithm.
I don't know the name of the algorithm, but is somewhat similar to the integer partition.
Given an integer, and an array of integer, the algorithm should find which subarray if summed, give the given number.

edit: The first algorithm I wrote works fine, the second algorithm doesn't give the same result why?

Example:

integer = 7
array = {6, 1, 3, 4}

Result:

6+1
3+4

First array:

void brute_force(int x, int array[4]){
    //variable declaration
    int sum = 0;

    //begin of algorithm
    for (int i = 0; i<4; i++) {
        for (int m = i; m<4; m++) {
            sum = array[i]; 
            for (int n = m; n<4; n++) {
                if (n != m) {
                    sum += array[n];
                    cout << sum;
                    if(x == sum){ cout << " found!"; }
                    cout << endl;
                }
            }
            sum = 0;
        }
    }
}

Second array:

void brute_force_ptr(int x, int *ptr,int l_array){
    //variable declaration
    int sum = 0;
    int *ptr2;

    // begin of algorithm
    for (int i = 0; i<l_array; i++) { //for 1
        for (int m = i; m<l_array; m++) { // for 2
            sum = *ptr;
            ptr2 = ptr;
            for (int n = m; n<l_array; n++) { //for 3
                if (n != m) {
                    sum += *ptr2;
                    cout << sum;
                    if(x == sum){cout << " found!";}
                    cout << endl;
                }
                ptr2++;
            } //endfor 3
            sum = 0;
        } //endfor2
        ptr++;
    } // end for1
}

output for:

x = 7 and array = {6, 1, 3, 4}

first algorithm

7 found!
10
14
9
13
10
4
8
5
7 found!

second algorithm

7 found!
10 
14
7 found!
10 
7 found!
4 
8 
4 
7 found! 
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marked as duplicate by Lightness Races in Orbit, Björn Pollex, Nawaz, ildjarn, Tim Aug 2 '11 at 20:53

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
sorry for the repost :D –  Pella86 Aug 2 '11 at 20:39
    
Don't apologise for a repost. Don't do it. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Aug 2 '11 at 20:42
1  
This is the Subset Sum Problem. –  Björn Pollex Aug 2 '11 at 20:43
    
How have you shown that the first algorithm is correct? From a cursory glance, the output from the first algorithm appears suspect (how are 9 or 13 found?, it appears that would be 6+3 and 6+3+4, neither of which are contained in a "subarray" since they are not contiguous). The second algorithm is likely finding 6+1, 1+6 3+4 and 4+3 as distinct entries. NOTE: If this is attempting to be the Subset Sum Problem as Björn Pollex has pointed out, then referring to the results as "subarrays" is incorrect. –  Chad Aug 2 '11 at 20:47

1 Answer 1

I just took a quick look, I do not know about the correctness of the algorithm, but the reason for the difference is that looks as though inside the third for loop,

if (n != m) {
     sum += *ptr2;

is incorrect.

It needs to be

if (n != m) {
     sum += *(ptr2+i);

, because your code that works has

if (n != m) {
     sum += array[n];

and in pointer arithmetic

arr[ n ] == * ( arr + n )
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