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I'm curious if Scala has some gem hidden in its collection classes that I can use. Basically I'm looking for something like a FIFO queue, but that has an upper-limit on its size such that when the limit is hit, the oldest (first) element is removed from the queue. I've implemented this myself in Java in the past, but I'd rather use something standard if possible.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 11 down vote accepted

An often preferable alternative to subclassing is the (unfortunately named) "pimp my library" pattern. You can use it to add an enqueueFinite method to Queue, like so:

import scala.collection.immutable.Queue
class FiniteQueue[A](q: Queue[A]) {
  def enqueueFinite[B >: A](elem: B, maxSize: Int): Queue[B] = {
    var ret = q.enqueue(elem)
    while (ret.size > maxSize) { ret = ret.dequeue._2 }
    ret
  }
}
implicit def queue2finitequeue[A](q: Queue[A]) = new FiniteQueue[A](q)

Whenever queue2finitequeue is in scope, you can treat Queue objects as though they have the enqueueFinite method:

val maxSize = 3
val q1 = Queue(1, 2, 3)
val q2 = q1.enqueueFinite(5, maxSize)
val q3 = q2.map(_+1)
val q4 = q3.enqueueFinite(7, maxSize)

The advantage of this approach over subclassing is that enqueueFinite is available to all Queues, including those that are constructed via operations like enqueue, map, ++, etc.

Update: As Dylan says in the comments, enqueueFinite needs also to take a parameter for the maximum queue size, and drop elements as necessary. I updated the code.

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Cool. But how do you pass the maximum queue size ? –  paradigmatic Aug 3 '11 at 7:10
    
I see two options: your finite queue is mutable, in which case you change the size after its creation (removing elements if necessary), or your queue is immutable, in which case you would add the limit to the enqueueFinite method. –  Dylan Aug 3 '11 at 14:00
    
or you could add an implicit Int parameter. –  Jus12 Sep 19 '14 at 19:24
    
Why not use an implicit class? object FiniteQueue { implicit class FiniteQueue[A](q: Queue[A]) { def enqueueFinite[B >: A](elem: B, maxSize: Int): Queue[B] = { var ret = q.enqueue(elem) while (ret.size > maxSize) { ret = ret.dequeue._2 } ret } } } –  AlonL Oct 18 '14 at 21:13

Why don't you just subclass a FIFO queue? Something like this should work: (pseudocode follows...)

class Limited(limit:Int) extends FIFO {
  override def enqueue() = {
    if (size >= limit) {
      //remove oldest element
    }
    super.enqueue()
  }
}
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1  
Another option is to use the "pimp my library" pattern to add an enqueueFinite method to the Queue class. This seems preferable because it avoids type problems with the usual methods (map, ++, ...) –  Kipton Barros Aug 2 '11 at 23:47
    
@Kipton you should make your own answer. I think it's really preferable indeed. –  Daniel C. Sobral Aug 2 '11 at 23:57
    
Done, thanks for the suggestion. –  Kipton Barros Aug 3 '11 at 0:32

Here is an immutable solution:

class FixedSizeFifo[T](val limit: Int)
( private val out: List[T], private val in: List[T] ) 
extends Traversable[T] {

  override def size = in.size + out.size

  def :+( t: T ) = {
    val (nextOut,nextIn) = if (size == limit) {
      if( out.nonEmpty) {
        ( out.tail, t::in ) 
      } else {
        ( in.reverse.tail, List(t) )
      }
    } else ( out, t::in )
      new FixedSizeFifo( limit )( nextOut, nextIn )
  }

  private lazy val deq = {
    if( out.isEmpty ) {
      val revIn = in.reverse
      ( revIn.head, new FixedSizeFifo( limit )( revIn.tail, List() ) )
    } else {
      ( out.head, new FixedSizeFifo( limit )( out.tail, in ) )
    }
  }
  override lazy val head = deq._1
  override lazy val tail = deq._2

  def foreach[U]( f: T => U ) = ( out ::: in.reverse ) foreach f

}

object FixedSizeFifo {
  def apply[T]( limit: Int ) = new FixedSizeFifo[T]( limit )(List(),List())
}

An example:

val fifo = FixedSizeFifo[Int](3) :+ 1 :+ 2 :+ 3 :+ 4 :+ 5 :+ 6
println( fifo )                //prints: FixedSizeFifo(4, 5, 6)
println( fifo.head )           //prints: 4
println( fifo.tail :+ 7 :+8 )  //prints: FixedSizeFifo(6, 7, 8)
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