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I've been getting up to speed with R in the last month and this is my first post here. Looking forward to joining the community. Here is my question:

What is a good way to assign colors to categorical variables in ggplot2 that have stable mapping? I need consistent colors across a set of graphs that have different subsets and different number of categorical variables.

For example,

plot1 <- ggplot(data, aes(xData, yData,color=categoricaldData)) + geom_line()

where categoricalData has 5 levels.

And then

plot2 <- ggplot(data.subset, aes(xData.subset, yData.subset, 
                                 color=categoricaldData.subset)) + geom_line()

where categoricalData.subset has 3 levels.

However, a particular level that is in both sets will end up with a different color, which makes it harder to read the graphs together.

Do I need to create a vector of colors in the data frame? Or is there another way to assigns specific colors to categories?

Thanks

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4 Answers 4

up vote 29 down vote accepted

For simple situations like the exact example in the OP, I agree that Thierry's answer is the best. However, I think it's useful to point out another approach that becomes easier when you're trying to maintain consistent color schemes across multiple data frames that are not all obtained by subsetting a single large data frame. Managing the factors levels in multiple data frames can become tedious if they are being pulled from separate files and not all factor levels appear in each file.

One way to address this is to create a custom manual colour scale as follows:

#Some test data
dat <- data.frame(x=runif(10),y=runif(10),
        grp = rep(LETTERS[1:5],each = 2),stringsAsFactors = TRUE)

#Create a custom color scale
myColors <- brewer.pal(5,"Set1")
names(myColors) <- levels(dat$grp)
colScale <- scale_colour_manual(name = "grp",values = myColors)

and then add the color scale onto the plot as needed:

#One plot with all the data
p <- ggplot(dat,aes(x,y,colour = grp)) + geom_point()
p1 <- p + colScale

#A second plot with only four of the levels
p2 <- p %+% droplevels(subset(dat[4:10,])) + colScale

The first plot looks like this:

enter image description here

and the second plot looks like this:

enter image description here

This way you don't need to remember or check each data frame to see that they have the appropriate levels.

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This will work, but is probably over-complicated. I don't think you need to create a manual scale for this. All you need is a factor that is common between all plots. –  Andrie Aug 3 '11 at 10:31
3  
@Andrie - For a single subset, yeah. But if you're juggling lots of data sets that weren't all created by subsetting one original data frame, I find this strategy much simpler. –  joran Aug 3 '11 at 13:48
    
@joran Thanks Joran. This worked for me! It creates a legend with the right number of factors. I like the approach and to get color mappings across different data sets is well-worth the three lines. –  wintour Aug 5 '11 at 19:46
    
@Rafael - No problem! I would recommend that you check back here in a few days, though, as hadley may yet swoop in with a better answer. He is the expert, after all. –  joran Aug 5 '11 at 19:57
1  
I needed: library("RColorBrewer") –  PatrickT Apr 25 '14 at 21:26

I am in the same situation pointed out by malcook in his comment: unfortunately the answer by Thierry does not work with ggplot2 version 0.9.3.1.

png("figure_%d.png")
set.seed(2014)
library(ggplot2)
dataset <- data.frame(category = rep(LETTERS[1:5], 100), x = rnorm(500, mean = rep(1:5, 100)), y = rnorm(500, mean = rep(1:5, 100)))
dataset$fCategory <- factor(dataset$category)
subdata <- subset(dataset, category %in% c("A", "D", "E"))

ggplot(dataset, aes(x = x, y = y, colour = fCategory)) + geom_point()
ggplot(subdata, aes(x = x, y = y, colour = fCategory)) + geom_point()

Here it is the first figure:

enter image description here

and the second figure:

enter image description here

As we can see the colors do not stay fixed, for example E switches from magenta to blu.

As suggested by malcook in his comment and by hadley in his comment the code which uses limits works properly:

ggplot(subdata, aes(x = x, y = y, colour = fCategory)) + geom_point() + scale_colour_discrete(drop=TRUE,limits = levels(dataset$fCategory))

gives the following figure which is correct:

enter image description here

This is the output from sessionInfo():

R version 3.0.2 (2013-09-25)
Platform: x86_64-pc-linux-gnu (64-bit)

locale:
 [1] LC_CTYPE=en_US.UTF-8       LC_NUMERIC=C              
 [3] LC_TIME=en_US.UTF-8        LC_COLLATE=en_US.UTF-8    
 [5] LC_MONETARY=en_US.UTF-8    LC_MESSAGES=en_US.UTF-8   
 [7] LC_PAPER=en_US.UTF-8       LC_NAME=C                 
 [9] LC_ADDRESS=C               LC_TELEPHONE=C            
[11] LC_MEASUREMENT=en_US.UTF-8 LC_IDENTIFICATION=C       

attached base packages:
[1] methods   stats     graphics  grDevices utils     datasets  base     

other attached packages:
[1] ggplot2_0.9.3.1

loaded via a namespace (and not attached):
 [1] colorspace_1.2-4   dichromat_2.0-0    digest_0.6.4       grid_3.0.2        
 [5] gtable_0.1.2       labeling_0.2       MASS_7.3-29        munsell_0.4.2     
 [9] plyr_1.8           proto_0.3-10       RColorBrewer_1.0-5 reshape2_1.2.2    
[13] scales_0.2.3       stringr_0.6.2 
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2  
You should post this as a new question, referencing this question and showing why the solutions here didn't work. –  Brian Diggs Jan 15 '14 at 20:19
    
A similar question was asked here, but I'd like to point out that the accepted answer works fine. –  tonytonov Mar 6 at 17:19

The easiest solution is to convert your categorical variable to a factor prior to the subsetting. Bottomline is that you need a factor variable with exact the same levels in all your subsets.

library(ggplot2)
dataset <- data.frame(category = rep(LETTERS[1:5], 100), x = rnorm(500, mean = rep(1:5, 100)), y = rnorm(500, mean = rep(1:5, 100)))
dataset$fCategory <- factor(dataset$category)
subdata <- subset(dataset, category %in% c("A", "D", "E"))

With a character variable

ggplot(dataset, aes(x = x, y = y, colour = category)) + geom_point()
ggplot(subdata, aes(x = x, y = y, colour = category)) + geom_point()

With a factor variable

ggplot(dataset, aes(x = x, y = y, colour = fCategory)) + geom_point()
ggplot(subdata, aes(x = x, y = y, colour = fCategory)) + geom_point()
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+1 I agree that this is a good approach. –  Andrie Aug 3 '11 at 10:32
3  
The easiest way is to use limits –  hadley Aug 3 '11 at 22:35
    
Could provide an example in this context Hadley? I'm not sure how to use limits with a factor. –  Thierry Aug 5 '11 at 9:10
    
@Thierry Thanks. I was happy to get responses on my first post. And thanks Thierry or adding in reproducible code as I should've in my post...My categorical variables were the right type - factors. The other issue is I want the legend not to show unused factors. R ignores unused character variables when building the legend. However, unused factors persist. If I drop them using: subdata$category <- factor(subdata$category)[drop=TRUE] then the legend has the right number of factors BUT losses the mapping. –  wintour Aug 5 '11 at 19:37
7  
@Thierry - in my hands, using ggplot2_0.9.3.1, this method does not (any longer?) work; the colors assigned to the fCategory are different between the two plots. However, happily, @wintour, I figured that @hadley is suggesting that + scale_colour_discrete(drop=TRUE,limits = levels(dataset$fCategory)) to preserve the color|factor association but, which works, except, in my hands, the drop=TRUE is NOT being respected (I expect it to remove the level from the legend). Drat ... or is it me? –  malcook Oct 30 '13 at 19:15

Based on the very helpful answer by joran I was able to come up with this solution for a stable color scale for a boolean factor (TRUE, FALSE).

boolColors <- as.character(c("TRUE"="#5aae61", "FALSE"="#7b3294"))
boolScale <- scale_colour_manual(name="myboolean", values=boolColors)

ggplot(myDataFrame, aes(date, duration)) + 
  geom_point(aes(colour = myboolean)) +
  boolScale

Since ColorBrewer isn't very helpful with binary color scales, the two needed colors are defined manually.

Here myboolean is the name of the column in myDataFrame holding the TRUE/FALSE factor. date and duration are the column names to be mapped to the x and y axis of the plot in this example.

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