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Sometimes git suggests git rm --cached to unstage a file, sometimes git reset HEAD file. When should I use which?

EDIT:

D:\code\gt2>git init
Initialized empty Git repository in D:/code/gt2/.git/
D:\code\gt2>touch a

D:\code\gt2>git status
# On branch master
#
# Initial commit
#
# Untracked files:
#   (use "git add <file>..." to include in what will be committed)
#
#       a
nothing added to commit but untracked files present (use "git add" to track)

D:\code\gt2>git add a

D:\code\gt2>git status
# On branch master
#
# Initial commit
#
# Changes to be committed:
#   (use "git rm --cached <file>..." to unstage)
#
#       new file:   a
#
D:\code\gt2>git commit -m a
[master (root-commit) c271e05] a
 0 files changed, 0 insertions(+), 0 deletions(-)
 create mode 100644 a

D:\code\gt2>touch b

D:\code\gt2>git status
# On branch master
# Untracked files:
#   (use "git add <file>..." to include in what will be committed)
#
#       b
nothing added to commit but untracked files present (use "git add" to track)

D:\code\gt2>git add b

D:\code\gt2>git status
# On branch master
# Changes to be committed:
#   (use "git reset HEAD <file>..." to unstage)
#
#       new file:   b
#
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1  
Why? I'd say it's because git's commandline interface evolved organically and has never been subject to a major restructuring to make things consistent. (If you disagree, note how git rm can both stage a deletion and also unstage an addition) –  romkyns Jan 12 at 14:07
    
@romkyns: I agree that Git's interface has several oddities because it evolved organically, but a removal is surely an inverse function of an addition, so isn't it logical for rm to undo add? How do you think rm should behave? –  Josh Aug 25 at 20:04

7 Answers 7

up vote 276 down vote accepted

git rm --cached doesn't unstage a file. It stages the removal of the file from the repo and leaves the file in your working tree, leaving you with an untracked file. git reset on the other hand, will unstage any staged changes for a given file.

Edit: Thinking about it, though, if you used git rm --cached on a new file that is staged, it would basically look like you had just unstaged it since it had never been committed before. Maybe that's what you were seeing?

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I provided an example in my edit. –  Senthess Aug 2 '11 at 22:18
7  
I would say git rm --cached unstages the file but doesn't remove it from the working directory. –  Pierre de LESPINAY Dec 11 '12 at 14:46
    
This is a bit like cvs rm to locally undo cvs add all over again. –  Kaz Aug 16 '13 at 1:56
    
To remove a file staged for addition so that it is no longer staged can surely be called "unstaging a file staged for addition", right? The end result is not a staged deletion, that's for sure, hence I think the misunderstanding is totally understandable. –  romkyns Jan 12 at 14:16
    
@Kaz, who uses CVS anymore ? Long life to git ! (the first versioning that is understandable by developers) –  Snicolas Jul 19 at 17:44

git rm --cached is used to remove a file from the index. In the case where the file is already in the repo, git rm --cached will remove the file from the index, leaving it in the working directory and a commit will now remove it from the repo as well. Basically, after the commit, you would have unversioned the file and kept a local copy.

git reset HEAD file ( which by default is using the --mixed flag) is different in that in the case where the file is already in the repo, it replaces the index version of the file with the one from repo (HEAD), effectively unstaging the modifications to it.

In the case of unversioned file, it is going to unstage the entire file as the file was not there in the HEAD. In this aspect git reset HEAD file and git rm --cached are same, but they are not same ( as explained in the case of files already in the repo)

To the question of Why are there 2 ways to unstage a file in git? - there is never really only one way to do anything in git. that is the beauty of it :)

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9  
This is the clearest explanation for "git rm --cached" I found on stackoverflow. Thanks a lot! –  kakyo Feb 18 '13 at 18:03
3  
Really Clear and to the point.. Thanks a lot @manojlds –  Arindam Paul Apr 18 '13 at 13:44
    
Both the accepted answer and this one are great, and explain why you would use one vs the other. But they don't directly answer the implicit question of why does git suggest two different methods. In the first case in the OP's example, a git init has just been done. In that case, git suggests "git rm --cached" because at that point there are no commits in the repository and so HEAD is not valid. "git reset HEAD -- a" produces: "fatal: Failed to resolve 'HEAD' as a valid ref." –  sootsnoot Aug 16 at 13:56

This thread is a bit old, but I still want to add a little demonstration since it is still not an intuitive problem:

me$ git status
# On branch master
# Changes to be committed:
#   (use "git reset HEAD <file>..." to unstage)
#
#   new file:   to-be-added
#   modified:   to-be-modified
#   deleted:    to-be-removed
#

me$ git rm --cached to-be-added
rm 'to-be-added'

    # ok

me$ git reset -q HEAD to-be-modified

    # ok

me$ git reset -q HEAD to-be-removed

    # ok

me$ git status
# On branch master
# Changes not staged for commit:
#   (use "git add/rm <file>..." to update what will be committed)
#   (use "git checkout -- <file>..." to discard changes in working directory)
#
#   modified:   to-be-modified
#   deleted:    to-be-removed
#
# Untracked files:
#   (use "git add <file>..." to include in what will be committed)
#
#   to-be-added
no changes added to commit (use "git add" and/or "git commit -a")

git reset HEAD (without -q) gives a warning about the modified file and its exit code is 1 which will be considered as an error in a script.

Edit: git checkout HEAD to-be-modified to-be-removed also works for unstaging, but removes the change completely from the workspace

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Thanks, wasn't entirely clear from the first two answers (probably just my ignorance on terminology) that git reset left the modifications in the file locally (as opposed to git checkout which would revert them). –  soupdog Sep 5 '13 at 3:17

These 2 commands have several subtle differences if the file in question is already in the repo and under version control (previously committed etc.):

  • git reset HEAD <file> unstages the file in the current commit.
  • git rm --cached <file> will unstage the file for future commits also. It's unstaged untill it gets added again with git add <file>.

And there's one more important difference:

  • After running git rm --cached <file> and push your branch to the remote, anyone pulling your branch from the remote will get the file ACTUALLY deleted from their folder, even though in your local working set the file just becomes untracked (i.e. not physically deleted from the folder).

This last difference is important for projects which include a config file where each developer on the team has a different config (i.e. different base url, ip or port setting) so if you're using git rm --cached <file> anyone who pulls your branch will have to manually re-create the config, or you can send them yours and they can re-edit it back to their ip settings (etc.), because the delete only effects people pulling your branch from the remote.

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It would seem to me that git rm --cached <file> removes the file from the index without removing it from the directory where a plain git rm <file> would do both, just as an OS rm <file> would remove the file from the directory without removing its versioning.

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Quite simply:

  • git rm --cached <file> makes git stop tracking the file completely (leaving it in the filesystem, unlike plain git rm)
  • git reset HEAD <file> unstages any modifications made to the file since the last commit (but doesn't revert them in the filesystem, contrary to what the command name might suggest). The file remains under revision control. If the file wasn't in revision control before (i.e. you're unstaging a file that you had just git added for the first time), then the two commands have the same effect, hence the appearance of these being "two ways of doing something".

† I was scared for an embarrassingly long time to use the git reset command because of its name -- and still today I often look up the syntax to make sure I don't screw up.

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Simply use this command

git rm --cached "file name"
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