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I have 10 tables. Each table referenced by foreign keys of other 5 tables.

I need to change the primary key value of those 10 tables. Is there any way to change it so that it will change automatically all the foreign keys?

I am using sql server 2008 and have the management studio.

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1  
Just out of curiosity, why do you want to do this? –  Abe Miessler Aug 2 '11 at 22:27
    
@Abe Miessler: I have to change the structure of my db. I want to create to all this 10 tables a supertype. –  Naor Aug 2 '11 at 22:45

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You need to set ON UPDATE CASCADE for those foreign keys:

ALTER TABLE bar
ADD CONSTRAINT FK_foo_bar
FOREIGN KEY (fooid) REFERENCES foo(id)
ON UPDATE CASCADE

Then you simply update the FKs and referring fields will also be updated as part of the transaction:

UPDATE foo SET id = id + 1000

Note that to alter constraints they need to be dropped.

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Will UPDATE CASCADE change automatically the FK field in the table that holds the reference? –  Naor Aug 3 '11 at 0:11
    
@Naor, yes that's pretty much the point of it :) –  Serguei Aug 3 '11 at 0:14

Here is a sample how you can do it using the ON UPDATE CASCADE foreign key option. The part you'll be interested in are the two ALTER TABLE statements.

If you are using IDENTITY columns for your primary keys then this becomes more difficult as you can't update an IDENTITY column.

CREATE TABLE Parent
(
    ParentId INT NOT NULL CONSTRAINT [PK_Parent] PRIMARY KEY CLUSTERED,
    Name VARCHAR(10) NOT NULL
)

CREATE TABLE Child 
(
  ChildId INT NOT NULL CONSTRAINT [PK_Child] PRIMARY KEY CLUSTERED,
  ParentId INT NOT NULL CONSTRAINT [FK_Child_ParentId] FOREIGN KEY REFERENCES Parent (ParentId),
  Name VARCHAR(10) NOT NULL
)

INSERT INTO Parent (ParentId, Name) VALUES (1, 'Bob')
INSERT INTO Parent (ParentId, Name) VALUES (2, 'Sue')

INSERT INTO Child (ChildId, Name, ParentId) VALUES (1, 'Alice', 1)
INSERT INTO Child (ChildId, Name, ParentId) VALUES (2, 'Billy', 2)

SELECT * FROM Child 

-- Drop foreign key constraint and re-add 
ALTER TABLE Child 
  DROP CONSTRAINT [FK_Child_ParentId]

ALTER TABLE Child
 ADD CONSTRAINT [FK_Child_ParentId] 
    FOREIGN KEY (ParentId) REFERENCES Parent (ParentId) ON UPDATE CASCADE 

UPDATE Parent SET ParentId = ParentId + 100 

SELECT * FROM Child --shows the new ParentIds 

DROP TABLE Child 
DROP TABLE Parent 
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+1 for note about IDENTITY columns. –  Serguei Aug 2 '11 at 23:04
    
Once you are done, it might be worth updating the constraints back to not support cascading updates. –  Philip Kelley Aug 2 '11 at 23:13
    
@Chris Diver: I know that! I have identity column so what I did for each table was: 1. Create new_id column. 2. Set the new_id the new id. 3. Drop constraints. 4. Updated references with the new_id. 5. drop the primary key. 6. drop the old id column. 7. create the new primary key with the new_id. 8. rename the new_id to id. 9. Create again the constraints. I am looking to avoid all this. I am looking for a single command that will allow update the primary key and its references AUTOMATICALY because I have 10 tables to go. –  Naor Aug 3 '11 at 0:07
    
You should have stated your requirements clearer in the question. In that case I answered your question with you can't update an IDENTITY column. Thus you can't do it 'automatically'. But you could re-use the same T-SQL you used to create the new column etc... and specify table names and column names as variables. –  Chris Diver Aug 3 '11 at 0:19

I have never done this myself, and it sounds like it might be a bad idea. That said, I did find this article which goes over two methods for doing this:

http://support.microsoft.com/kb/142480

One uses stored procs and the other triggers. Both seem like a bit of a pain.

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I am not looking for a code that do it regulary with a button click. It is just single change in order to fix my db scheme. –  Naor Aug 2 '11 at 22:47

It's a significant disadvantage of an IDENTITY column that it can't be directly updated.

A workaround is not to use IDENTITY in the target table but put it in an extra table instead. Insert to the table with the IDENTITY column first, then insert the generated IDENTITY value to your target table.

SQL Server 2012 introduces table-independent Sequences, which are a better solution to the same problem. A sequence doesn't require the extra table.

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