Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.
int main () {
  vector<int> myvector;
  vector<int>::iterator it;

  // set some values:
  for (int i=1; i<=5; i++)
    myvector.push_back(i*10);          // myvector: 10 20 30 40 50

  myvector.resize(myvector.size()+3);  // allocate space for 3 more elements

  copy_backward ( myvector.begin(), myvector.begin()+5, myvector.end() );

  cout << "myvector contains:";
  for (it=myvector.begin(); it!=myvector.end(); ++it)
    cout << " " << *it;

  cout << endl;

  return 0;
}

Why the output is "myvector contains: 10 20 30 10 20 30 40 50"

why not "30 40 50 10 20 30 40 50"

The implementation of copy_backward is here:

template<class BidirectionalIterator1, class BidirectionalIterator2>
  BidirectionalIterator2 copy_backward ( BidirectionalIterator1 first,
                                         BidirectionalIterator1 last,
                                         BidirectionalIterator2 result )
{
  while (last!=first) *(--result) = *(--last);
  return result;
}

So confused. thank you for all your help.

share|improve this question
    
Related: stackoverflow.com/questions/1853358/… –  Billy ONeal Aug 2 '11 at 22:02
    
Why do you expect the first three elements to be modified? –  Michael Burr Aug 2 '11 at 22:04

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

That output looks right to me according to the way the code is written. You are copying from and into the same vector. You are copying from [begin, begin +5] (10 20 30 40 50) and you are copying to [end, end-5]. So 10 20 30 [10 20 30 40 50] is the right output for that code. The first 3 elements are untouched.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks. I got it. –  David Degea Aug 2 '11 at 22:09

If you want to copy something backwards, use reverse-iterators: rbegin() and rend(). Then just use the regular std::copy.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm not sure how this helps. To be fair, I'm not sure exactly what the OP wants. Where would the data for the 'new' first three elements come from? –  Michael Burr Aug 2 '11 at 22:09

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.