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I need a way to know the value of the constant used in the case statement. Is this possible? For example

private void myswitchfunc(string myvar) {
    switch(myvar) {
        case "hello":
             mycallback();  //no variable passing!
             break;
        case "hi":
             mycallback();  //no variable passing!
             break;
    }
}
private void mycallback() {
        //print the name of the constant in the calling case 
}

The farthest I got to is this http://www.csharp-examples.net/reflection-calling-method-name/

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2  
You should probably make it clear why you can't just pass on a value to the function you're calling, as that would seem to be the obvious choice. –  David Precious Aug 2 '11 at 22:12
    
Just pass it to the function... the "solution" you are looking for would be ridiculous. –  Ed S. Aug 2 '11 at 22:18
    
I am trying to provide a library of APIs. the "mycallback" is an API. The problem is this: the API function may not succeed and in this scenario I need to call the user's function with the same switch-case statement at a later time decided by my library. I solved the problem by a queue of delegates. –  tdolphin Aug 4 '11 at 7:43

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

No, you will need to pass the value. Or use a variable in a shared outer scope (From Cameron)

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1  
Or use a variable in a shared outer scope –  Cameron Aug 2 '11 at 22:11
    
Indeed, good point. –  DaveShaw Aug 2 '11 at 22:11
private static void myswitchfunc(string myvar)
{
    Action mycallback = () => Console.WriteLine(myvar);
    switch (myvar)
    {
        case "hello":
            mycallback();  //no variable passing!
            break;
        case "hi":
            mycallback();  //no variable passing!
            break;
    }
}
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Whilst strictly this answers the question set in the example, I somehow doubt this is what OP intends. Clever though. –  iandotkelly Aug 2 '11 at 22:18

Do you need to get as complex as using Reflection? Can you just just store the value of the constant in some member variable to access in the mycallback() method? For example:

class MyClass
{
    private string _MySwitchString;

    private void myswitchfunc(string myvar) {
    _MySwitchString = myvar;
    switch(myvar) {
        case "hello":
             mycallback();  //no variable passing!
             break;
        case "hi":
             mycallback();  //no variable passing!
             break;
       }
   }
   private void mycallback() {
           //print the name of the constant in the calling case 
      Console.Writeline(_MySwitchString); 
   }
}

Note this is untested.

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This is a case where you have to use "if", "else if" statements. This cannot be done with switch-case statements.

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Fair point @CharithJ. I don't think the question has relevance to the use of 'switch' or 'if' control flow. Its about, 'how can I pass information into my callback, when I can't pass it as a parameter to the call?', if you impose the rule that mycallback() cannot have a parameter. I normally leave a comment, but I thought that you'd just misread the question. How would using 'if' help? The equivalent if-else-if would work exactly the same. –  iandotkelly Aug 2 '11 at 23:03

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