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I asked the question as to whether a table layout was appropriate for a form for, say, gathering profile data. All respondents said "tables are bad", but I didn't see a clear answer on how to lay it out without forms that meet some basic requirements:

  • Labels and controls line up as would be expected
  • Don't have to specify hard coded widths
  • Don't float left and right potentially leaving a massive whitespace gap in the middle

    For example, consider this simple html layout http://jsfiddle.net/roger_davis/7h3bC/4/ How would you recommend modifying the html so that the labels lined up as expected (and were on the left.)

    I had a look, and nearly every web site I looked at used table layout here. For example, for profile editing right here on stackoverflow your profile input form is laid out in a table. Google logon page is a table, yahoo enroll doesn't use a table but does use a hard coded width.

    Am I missing something?

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    2  
    don't post a new question to follow up an existing one...just edit your existing question. –  DA. Aug 2 '11 at 22:50
        
    I think it's very sad that so many mainstream websites are happy to forsake accessibility guidelines. That said, doing this without declaring a width is a bit tricky... –  shanethehat Aug 2 '11 at 22:57
        
    possible duplicate of Best practice for form layout in html -- table or flow? –  Quentin Aug 2 '11 at 23:06
        
    Not enough to warrant a separate answer, so adding here as a comment to your second bullet point "don't have to specify hard coded widths" -- consider that you can use percentages instead of hard-coded widths! e.g., 40% for your "labels column" and 59% for the "inputs column"... ? (yes, 1 or 2% should be reserved for IE's miscalculations) Thus this would remove that as a requirement of yours? –  Funka Aug 2 '11 at 23:57
        
    oh, and also to follow up, "[don't float left and right potentially leave a large whitespace?]", the answer is no, if your float-left ("label") items are right-text-aligned!! ;-) –  Funka Aug 2 '11 at 23:58

    2 Answers 2

    Here is my update to your fiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/7h3bC/9/ basically define HTML:

    <ul class='controls'>
        <li> <input type="checkbox" name="mycheckbox" id='mycheckbox'></li>
        <li><input type="text" name="myInput" id='myInput'></li>
    </ul>
    <ul class='labels'>
        <li> <label for="mycheckbox" >Tick me if you dare</label></li>
        <li><label for="mycheckbox">  Tick me if you dare</label></li>
    </ul>
    

    and css

    <style>
    .controls,
    .labels
    {
        float:left;
    }
    .controls 
    {
         padding-right:5px;
         text-align:right;
    }
    
    </style>
    
    share|improve this answer
    2  
    Thanks for your feedback, but it doesn't really work robustly. It relies on the labels being the same height as the controls, which is often not the case. For example, if the text box was a text area with multiple lines this solution would have the labels all askew. –  Roger Davis Aug 2 '11 at 22:55
        
    The aim of tableless layouts is rooted in accessibility. This solution negates that by not positioning the labels next to the form elements in code, meaning that it would be confusing for screen readers. –  shanethehat Aug 2 '11 at 23:00
        
    @Roger: True. But the above is much more fluid to modify if you were to different controls and if you wanted to change certain aspects of the layout. There is sometimes also the advantage of less markup for the browser to render when you use a non-tabular layout. It all depends on what you need. I don't advocate always not using a table but using the tables with thought. –  scrappedcola Aug 2 '11 at 23:01
        
    @shanethehat: Not everyone is concerned about accessibility and it isn't always the goal of tableless layout. Yes the above would confuse a screen reader but the requirements was not to use set widths –  scrappedcola Aug 2 '11 at 23:03

    I'm not sure how good the browser support on this is, tested in FF4: http://jsfiddle.net/shanethehat/7h3bC/11/

    <div id="tableForm">
        <div class="tableRow">
            <div class="tableCell">
                <label for="mycheckbox">  Tick me if you dare</label>
            </div>
            <div class="tableCell">
                <input type="checkbox" name="mycheckbox" id="mycheckbox">
            </div>
        </div>
        <div class="tableRow">
            <div class="tableCell">
                <label for="mytext">  Give me some text test test</label>
            </div>
            <div class="tableCell">
                <input type="text" name="mytext" id="mytext">
            </div>
        </div>
    </div>
    
    
    div#tableForm {
     display:table;   
    }
    div.tableRow {
      display:table-row;  
    }
    div.tableCell {
        display:table-cell;   
        width:inherit;
    }
    

    Yes, I know, I've just created a table using divs. The point though is that this is nicely accessible and semantically proper.

    Edit: fails miserably in IE7 where fixed width would be the only way, but 8 and 9 seem OK.

    Edit2: switched the label/fields around and set right align: http://jsfiddle.net/shanethehat/7h3bC/12/. The markup is getting a little class heavy at this point. :first-child would be an alternative to using the left class, but at the expense of IE8.

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