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I am trying to translate this SQL query into a NHibernate solution:

SELECT MIN(TopTimes.StartTime)
FROM (SELECT TOP 100 StartTime FROM Pack ORDER BY StartTime DESC) AS TopTimes

Effectively for the last X (in this case 100) started packs I want to know what the minimum StartTime is. This doesn't seem complicated but after 2h googling I can't wrap my head around it somehow.

I have the subquery like this so far:

DetachedCriteria.For<Pack>()
    .SetProjection(Projections.Property("StartTime"))
    .SetMaxResults(100)
    .AddOrder(Order.Desc("StartTime"));

But I am not sure how to marry this up with the Projections.Min

Update: To elaborate a bit more:

Example: Let select StartTime from Pack return the following result:

2011-08-05 09:05:04.000
2011-08-05 08:05:04.000
2011-08-05 06:05:04.000
2011-08-05 05:05:04.000
2011-08-05 07:05:04.000

I want to keep the 2 most recent start times:

SELECT TOP 2 StartTime FROM Pack ORDER BY StartTime DESC

which returns:

2011-08-05 09:05:04.000
2011-08-05 08:05:04.000

Then I take the minimum of that which is 2011-08-05 08:05:04.000 and that's what I am after.

The suggested select top 2 StartTime from Pack order by StartTime ASC will return:

2011-08-05 05:05:04.000
2011-08-05 06:05:04.000

which is not what I need.

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2  
Hmmm, I don't understand your query, Selecting 'min' will yield 1 result. It's the same as doing: SELECT TOP 1 StartTime FROM Pack ORDER BY StartTime DESC, if you want a list of lowest starttime's then you wouldn't call 'MIN' since you've ordered it... The subquery isn't required. –  Phill Aug 3 '11 at 1:56
    
or SELECT MIN(StartTime) FROM Pack –  Firo Aug 3 '11 at 9:26
    
@Phill: I don't want the minimum of ALL. I want the minimum of the last X –  ChrisWue Aug 3 '11 at 16:05
    
@Chris - Then your current query is fine. Update 'DESC' to 'ASC' so the oldest date is first. –  Phill Aug 3 '11 at 22:27

1 Answer 1

Based on your comments on the question. You don't need to use 'MIN' at all.

'MIN' will return you a single result. If you had some criteria, with grouping, then you could return the minimum value of each group. But based on your information it's not required.

At the moment you're using DESC (Descending) which will list the dates from newest to oldest, so you would end up with say:

2011-06-15
2011-05-18
2011-05-13
2011-04-07

You want to update your query to use ASC (Ascending), so that you get the oldest date first, which will give you the same results like:

2011-04-07
2011-05-13
2011-05-18
2011-06-15

To update your query all you need to do is:

DetachedCriteria.For<Pack>()
    .SetProjection(Projections.Property("StartTime"))
    .SetMaxResults(100)
    .AddOrder(Order.Asc("StartTime"));

If you need this as a sub-query then can you please provide more information.


So you want to order all the results, and take the minimum date from that?

Then you could do:

DetachedCriteria.For<Pack>()
    .SetProjection(Projections.Min(Projections.Property("StartTime")))
    .SetMaxResults(100)
    .AddOrder(Order.Desc("StartTime"));

This would give you the lowest/oldest single date result from the last 100 results results.

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Your suggestion does not quite work. See my updated question. –  ChrisWue Aug 4 '11 at 16:15
    
@Chris - I updated my answer, is that what you're after? Er actually, you will need to sub-query that, and take the min off the sub-query. I just realised what you're doing. I'll update my answer in an hour when I get to work. –  Phill Aug 4 '11 at 22:26
    
@Chris - I've had a play around. I don't think it's going to be possible without using HQL. –  Phill Aug 5 '11 at 4:03
    
This can be achieved in L2S / EF. Can't figure this one out in NH tho. –  Phill Aug 5 '11 at 4:13

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