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I have an enum like this:

public enum Cities
{
    [Description("New York City")]
    NewYork,
    [Description("Los Angeles")]
    LosAngeles,
    Washington,
    [Description("San Antonio")]
    SanAntonio,
    Chicago
}

I want to bind this to a combobox and I've tried this:

comboBox.DataSource = Enum.GetNames(typeof(Cities));

But that displays the values in the combobox rather than the String description. So I switched to this:

public static string GetEnumDescription(Enum value)
{
    FieldInfo fi = value.GetType().GetField(value.ToString());

    DescriptionAttribute[] attributes = (DescriptionAttribute[])fi.GetCustomAttributes(typeof(DescriptionAttribute), false);

    if (attributes != null && attributes.Length > 0)
    {
        return attributes[0].Description;
    }
    else
    {
        return value.ToString();
    }
}

public static IList ToList(this Type type)
{
    ArrayList list = new ArrayList();
    Array enumValues = Enum.GetValues(type);

    foreach (Enum value in enumValues)
    {
        list.Add(new KeyValuePair<Enum, string>(value, GetEnumDescription(value)));
    }

    return list;
}

Now the list.Add() call results in the value and it's string description being displayed in the combobox so I replaced

list.Add(new KeyValuePair<Enum, string>(value, GetEnumDescription(value)));

with

list.Add(GetEnumDescription(value));

and now I'm getting just the descriptive string displayed in the combobox which is what I ultimately want. Now my data binding is broken because it can't find just the string description in the enumeration. I thought this might be related to combobox.DisplayMember and combobox.ValueMember but I haven't been able to resolve the problem yet. Can anyone tell me how the heck I display the descriptive string but have my data binding use the value for storing, etc.? Thank you!!!

share|improve this question
    
Just out of curiousity.. why do you have to use an Enum for this? –  Tom Studee Aug 3 '11 at 2:21
    
I need to display several comboboxes that contain different fixed choices for my users to choose from. Maybe there's a combobox to display four colors (red, yellow, green, blue). Another might display a list of shapes for them to choose from. Since these are fixed lists, I thought an enum would make sense. I have a "data" class that models all of these things and when the user has finished making their selections in the UI, I just parse through the data object's properties and save the values to a file. Does that answer your question? –  user685869 Aug 3 '11 at 2:32
    
Yes, and it will work fine the way you're doing it, just makes the code a little more tricky. Since this is a hardcoded list anyway, what would be the drawback of instantiating a hard-coded list at runtime as an alternative? –  Tom Studee Aug 3 '11 at 2:34
    
I don't suppose there would be any drawback to that. I was just trying to keep everything nice and neat in my data class and learn more about enumerations and databinding in the process. :-) –  user685869 Aug 3 '11 at 2:36

1 Answer 1

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Let's go back to your question I answered a few days ago and modify that to suit your new requirements. So I'll keep the colorEnum example in place of your Cities enum in this question.

You're most of the way there - you've got the code to go from the enum to the description string; now you just need to go back the other way.

public static class EnumHelper
{
    // your enum->string method (I just decluttered it a bit :))
    public static string GetEnumDescription(Enum value)
    {
        var fi = value.GetType().GetField(value.ToString());
        var attributes = fi.GetCustomAttributes(typeof(DescriptionAttribute), false);

        if (attributes.Length > 0)
            return ((DescriptionAttribute)attributes[0]).Description;
        else
            return value.ToString();        
    }

    // the method to go from string->enum
    public static T GetEnumFromDescription<T>(string stringValue)
        where T : struct
    {
        foreach (object e in Enum.GetValues(typeof(T)))           
            if (GetEnumDescription((Enum)e).Equals(stringValue))
                return (T)e;
        throw new ArgumentException("No matching enum value found.");
    }

    // and a method to get a list of string values - no KeyValuePair needed
    public static IEnumerable<string> GetEnumDescriptions(Type enumType)
    {
        var strings = new Collection<string>();
        foreach (Enum e in Enum.GetValues(enumType))   
            strings.Add(GetEnumDescription(e));
        return strings;
    }
}

Now, take what you had a few days ago...

public class Person 
{
    [...]
    public colorEnum FavoriteColor { get; set; }
    public string FavoriteColorString
    {
        get { return FavoriteColor.ToString(); }
        set { FavoriteColor = (colorEnum)Enum.Parse(typeof(colorEnum), value);  }
    }
}

and just change it to this:

public class Person 
{
    [...]
    public colorEnum FavoriteColor { get; set; }
    public string FavoriteColorString
    {
        get { return EnumHelper.GetEnumDescription(FavoriteColor); }
        set { FavoriteColor = EnumHelper.GetEnumFromDescription<colorEnum>(value); }
    }
}

As before, you'll bind the combobox SelectedItem value to FavoriteColorString. You don't need to set the DisplayMember or ValueMember properties if you're still using the BindingSource as you were in the other question, which I assume you are.

And change the combobox populating code from:

comboBoxFavoriteColor.DataSource = Enum.GetNames(typeof(colorEnum));

to

comboBoxFavoriteColor.DataSource = EnumHelper.GetEnumDescriptions(typeof(colorEnum));

Now you have the best of all worlds. The user sees the description, your code contains the enum names, and the data store contains the enum values.

share|improve this answer
    
You've given me many great answers over the past week or so and I very much appreciate the help and explanations. As always, thank you for your sharing your expertise! –  user685869 Aug 7 '11 at 23:04
1  
@user68: You're welcome. By the way, the reason I removed the attributes != null check in GetEnumDescription() is that GetCustomAttributes() just returns an empty array when it doesn't find any attributes. –  Igby Largeman Aug 7 '11 at 23:16
    
@user68: and one other thing... you can upvote my answers as well as accepting them. I appreciate any rep I can earn. :) –  Igby Largeman Aug 7 '11 at 23:17
    
Thanks for pointing out the upvote feature! I'll do that for all of your answers right now!! –  user685869 Aug 8 '11 at 0:06
    
This is good, but I think I saw something cleaner somewhere ... –  Hamish Grubijan Aug 9 '11 at 0:09

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