Sign up ×
Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other. Join them; it only takes a minute:

I see { } are used for closures, and then I believe when a $ is put in front of braces, it is simply doing a variable substitution within a string. I can't find the documentation on how the $ works in the reference ... hard to search on it unfortunately, and the Groovy String documentation is lacking in introducing this. Can you please point me to the documentation and/or explain the "$" operator in Groovy -- how all it can be used? Does Grails extend it at all beyond Groovy?


share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 12 down vote accepted

In a GString (groovy string), any valid Groovy expression can be enclosed in the ${...} including method calls etc.

This is detailed in the following GString page

share|improve this answer
Thanks for pointing that it's in the GString section. The String section used ${} in one of its examples and didn't introduce it. – Ray Aug 3 '11 at 17:34

Grails does not extend the usage of $ beyond Groovy. Here are two practical usages of $

String Interpolation

Within a GString you can use $ without {} to evaluate a property path, e.g.

def date = new Date()
println "The time is $date.time"

If you want to evaluate an expression which is more complex than a property path, you must use ${}, e.g.

println "The time is ${new Date().getTime()}"

Dynamic Code Execution

Dynamically accessing a property

def prop = "time"
new Date()."$prop"

Dynamically invoking a method

def prop = "toString"
new Date()."$prop"()

As pointed out in the comments this is really just a special case of string interpolation, because the following is also valid

new Date().'toString'()
share|improve this answer
Isn't your 2nd usage just an example of the 1st? As you can call methods by their string name like new Date().'toString'()? So it's just the first usage case to build a String which is then used to access methods/properties? – tim_yates Aug 3 '11 at 10:09
@tim - you're right, I guess what I'm really showing are two practical usages of string interpolation rather than two usages of $. I'll try and make this clearer – Dónal Aug 3 '11 at 11:24
+1 from me :-) Sorry I was being slightly pedantic, as it's a good example of where $ is really useful – tim_yates Aug 3 '11 at 11:32
Cool - thanks for showing an example of dynamically accessing a property and dynamically invoking method – Ray Aug 3 '11 at 17:55
I'd like to mark yours as an answer as well, or raise the points, but it is not allowing me to. Thanks for the grails clarification and examples. – Ray Aug 3 '11 at 18:03

$ is not an operator in Groovy. In string substitution it identifies variables within the string - there's no magic there. It's a common format used for inline variables in many template and programming languages.

All special Groovy operators are listed here:

share|improve this answer

Your Answer


By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.