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I am near the point of pulling my hair out over this one. This is the query I am working with:

           SELECT
            *,
            GROUP_CONCAT(DISTINCT d.title SEPARATOR ', ') AS departments,
            MAX(d.department_id) AS department_id,
            CONCAT(friendly_last_name, ', ', friendly_first_name) AS professor_name,
            IF( p.reviews = 0, "", p.quality ) AS quality,
            IF( p.reviews = 0, "", p.reviews ) AS reviews,
            IF( p.reviews = 0, "", p.ease ) AS ease,
            u.url
        FROM
            educational.professors_departments
            LEFT JOIN educational.professors p USING (professor_id)
            LEFT JOIN educational.departments d USING (department_id)
            LEFT JOIN educational.universities u ON (p.university_id = u.university_id)
        WHERE
            p.university_id = 3231
            AND d.department_id  IN ('91')
        GROUP BY
            professor_id
        ORDER BY p.friendly_last_name ASC, p.friendly_first_name ASC

When I run that query as is, I get 101 results. If I add a simple LIMIT 20 to the end of the query, all of the sudden the query returns one result.

As if that's not weird enough, if I change LIMIT 20 to LIMIT 25, I receive 25 results. Is there some magical thing that I'm missing about this? I can not for the life of me figure it out.

P.S. - I have tried SQL_NO_CACHE to no avail. P.P.S. - If I remove the entire ORDER BY clause, but leave LIMIT 20...I get 20 results

share|improve this question
    
I get the same results using SQLYog, haven't tried directly in the shell but SQLYog doesn't do any funny processing and theoretically should be the exact same. – Colin M Aug 3 '11 at 2:41
    
Is it possible that you're actually getting null values for the first 20 results or so and they aren't showing up as text in your shell or are you getting a 'x rows returned' message from your shell? – dfb Aug 3 '11 at 2:46
    
SQLYog was saying "1 row returned," but just to be sure I ran it in a shell and also got one row with "1 row in set" – Colin M Aug 3 '11 at 2:47
up vote 2 down vote accepted

I can only guess the engine is doing its best to guess on some elements... you have left joins which I don't believe is what you really want... just NORMAL joins... I would first try an EXPLAIN on your query and see what it comes up with that might show insight with indexes, full table scans, etc...

Additionally, using a select * is typically bad and lazy querying. Get the columns you want and expect. If a structure ever changes and you rely on *, you could get hosed unforeseen in the future.

I would restructure as follows, see results and check ITs EXPLAIN

SELECT STRAIGHT_JOIN
      p.Professor_ID,
      CONCAT(p.friendly_last_name, ', ', p.friendly_first_name) AS professor_name,
      GROUP_CONCAT(DISTINCT d.title SEPARATOR ', ') AS departments,
      MAX(d.department_id) AS department_id,
      IF( p.reviews = 0, "", p.quality ) AS quality,
      IF( p.reviews = 0, "", p.reviews ) AS reviews,
      IF( p.reviews = 0, "", p.ease ) AS ease,
      u.url
   FROM
      educational.professors p
         JOIN educational.professors_departments pd
            on p.Professor_ID = pd.Professor_ID
            JOIN educational.departments d
               on pd.Department_ID = d.Department_ID
              AND d.department_id  IN ('91')
         JOIN educational.universities u
            ON p.university_id = u.university_id
   WHERE
      p.university_id = 3231
   GROUP BY
      p.professor_id
   ORDER BY 
      p.friendly_last_name ASC, 
      p.friendly_first_name ASC
   LIMIT 20

Looking at your IF() clauses for quality, reviews, ease... were you intentionally only getting those values ONLY when p.Reviews = 0 for all 3 elements... or should they be representing each column of a value...

share|improve this answer
    
Tried using normal JOINS, got the same result. The SELECT * was there for debugging, I don't use it on development (but I do appreciate your attention to detail regardless). Your query seems to work. Yes, I was intending to use p.reviews = 0, because p.quality and p.ease wouldn't have any relevance if p.reviews = 0. Trying to figure out what about your query is making it work, though. – Colin M Aug 3 '11 at 2:49
    
@Colin Morelli, I would give it a shot anyway as STRAIGHT_JOIN helps on complex queries that are structured well. – DRapp Aug 3 '11 at 2:52
    
You, sir, are a genius...not to mention a hero because you just saved my head of hair. After all was said and done, the issue with my query (believe it or not) was the difference of USING vs ON in the JOIN clauses (tried with everything else changed, that was the only part that made a difference). But, I used your restructured query as it ran faster in my benchmark. Thank you. – Colin M Aug 3 '11 at 2:58

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