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So I am trying to model Gram-Schmidt for any size N×N matrix, and I have officially hit a roadblock I can't get past. I know it's a matter of looping this correctly, but I can't figure out what the problem is. Remember I do not want to just pass in a 3×3 matrix, but any size N×N.

The course notes QR Decomposition with Gram-Schmidt explains exactly what I want to do. Very simple calculation by the way. In the course notes ||u|| means that it is the sum of the square of the elements, so sqrt(x12 + x22 + x32 + .... + xn2).

The multiplication symbol is actually the dot product.

The code I wrote so far is listed below. What is wrong with it?

function qrProjection(arr) {
    var qProjected = [];
    var tempArray = [];
    var aTemp = arr;
    var uTemp = new Array(arr.length);
    var uSquareSqrt = new Array(arr.length);
    var eTemp = [];
    var sum = 0;
    var sumOfSquares = 0;
    var breakCondition = 0;
    var secondBreakCondition = 0;
    var iterationCounter = 0;

    //Build uTemp Array
    for (i = 0; i < arr.length; i++) {
        uTemp[i] = new Array(arr[i].length);
    }
    for (i = 0; i < arr.length; i++) {
        eTemp[i] = new Array(arr[i].length);
    }

    uTemp[0] = aTemp[0];

    for (j = 0; j <= arr.length; j++) {

        for (l = 0; l < arr[j].length; l++) {
            if (breakCondition == 1) break;
            sumOfSquares = Math.pow(uTemp[j][l], 2) + sumOfSquares;
        }

        if (breakCondition == 0) {
            uSquareSqrt[j] = Math.sqrt(sumOfSquares);
            sumOfSquares = 0;
        }

        for (i = 0; i < arr[j].length; i++) {
            if (breakCondition == 1) break;
            eTemp[j][i] = (1 / (uSquareSqrt[j])) * (uTemp[j][i]);
        }

        breakCondition = 1;

        if (iterationCounter == 0) {
            for (m = 0; m < arr[j].length; m++) {
                matrixDotProduct = aTemp[j + 1][m] * eTemp[j][m] + matrixDotProduct;
            }
        }
        else {
            for (m = 0; m < arr[j].length; m++) {
                for (s = 0; s <= iterationCounter; s++) {

                    matrixDotProduct = aTemp[j + 1][s] * eTemp[m][s] + matrixDotProduct;
                }
                for (t = 0; t < arr[j].length; t++) {
                    uTemp[j + 1][t] = aTemp[j + 1][t] - eTemp[j][t] * matrixDotProduct;

                }
            }
        }

        if (iterationCounter == 0) {
            for (m = 0; m < arr[j].length; m++) {
                uTemp[j + 1][m] = aTemp[j + 1][m] - eTemp[j][m] * matrixDotProduct;
            }
        }

        matrixDotProduct = 0;

        for (l = 0; l < arr[j].length; l++) {
            sumOfSquares = Math.pow(uTemp[j + 1][l], 2) + sumOfSquares;
        }

        uSquareSqrt[j + 1] = Math.sqrt(sumOfSquares);
        sumOfSquares = 0;

        for (i = 0; i < arr[j].length; i++) {
            eTemp[j + 1][i] = (1 / (uSquareSqrt[j + 1])) * (uTemp[j + 1][i]);
        }

        iterationCounter++;
    }
    qProjected = eTemp;
    return qProjected;
}
share|improve this question
    
For starters, every for() statement you have must have a var declaration somewhere. E.g. for (var i = 0; i < arr.length; i += 1) {} –  Lance Aug 3 '11 at 5:02
1  
@Lance it is not required to initialize a variable without var, the code will still work. That being said, all the variables will be global, not local, and so it is considered very bad practice to not use var. –  Moses Aug 3 '11 at 5:21
    
Cool thanks guys I will add vars for all the i,j,m,l,etc variables I am using. Good to know as well. Appreciated. –  Spets Aug 3 '11 at 5:34
    
To reduce code and increase readability, note that an expression sum = x + sum; can be written as sum += x;. –  Nayuki Minase Aug 3 '11 at 5:48

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I must apologize that instead of tweaking your code, I wrote my own from scratch:

/* Main function of interest */

// Each entry of a matrix object represents a column
function gramSchmidt(matrixA, n) {
    var matrixU = new Array(n);
    var matrixE = new Array(n);

    for (var i = 0; i < n; i++) {
        var tempVector = matrixA[i];
        for (var j = 0; j < i; j++) {
            var dotProd = dot(matrixA[i], matrixE[j], n);
            var toSubtract = multiply(dotProd, matrixE[j], n);
            tempVector = subtract(tempVector, toSubtract, n);
        }
        matrixU[i] = tempVector;
        var nrm = norm(tempVector, n);
        matrixE[i] = multiply(1 / nrm, tempVector, n);
    }

    return matrixE;
}

/*
 * Example usage:
 * gramSchmidt([[1,0,0],[2,3,0],[5,4,7]], 3)
 *        ==>  [[1,0,0],[0,1,0],[0,0,1]]
 */


/* Simple vector arithmetic */

function subtract(vectorX, vectorY, n) {
    var result = new Array(n);
    for (var i = 0; i < n; i++)
        result[i] = vectorX[i] - vectorY[i];
    return result;
}

function multiply(scalarC, vectorX, n) {
    var result = new Array(n);
    for (var i = 0; i < n; i++)
        result[i] = scalarC * vectorX[i];
    return result;
}

function dot(vectorX, vectorY, n) {
    var sum = 0;
    for (var i = 0; i < n; i++)
        sum += vectorX[i] * vectorY[i];
    return sum;
}

function norm(vectorX, n) {
    return Math.sqrt(dot(vectorX, vectorX, n));
}

Note that the algorithm above computes the Gram-Schmidt orthogonalization, which is the matrix [e1 | e2 | ... | en], not the QR factorization!

share|improve this answer
    
Wow thanks man, really appreciate it. Yea with the [e1,e2,...en] matrix I can put together the QR Decomposition. The part that was tripping me up was the u(k+1) part. When I took Linear Algebra a few semesters ago I kept saying to myself, "Apart from Gaussian elimination, I won't use ANY of this other crap" and then I find myself opening up my old books and trying to figure out how to program it all in. Again, thanks again. –  Spets Aug 3 '11 at 6:17
    
I hope you can understand my code, and be able to reflect a bit about the structure and variables used in your own code. –  Nayuki Minase Aug 3 '11 at 6:21
    
I understand it, thanks. I am most familiar with MatLab(my engineering uses) and as such I obviously do not have good programming fundamentals but your post greatly helped me understand how I should proceed. It seems like the best way to approach it all is using short functions with easily understandable variables for debugging/tracking. Thanks again –  Spets Aug 3 '11 at 18:38
    
The main function that you wrote, "gramSchmidt" doesnt work, when the loop for (var j =0;....) is going, not sure what the goal of the loop is. MatrixE[j] isn't defined for when j=1,2,3.... since that is what we are looking for. I'm trying to fix your code and see if I can get it to work. Let me know if you missed something and didn't post it :) –  Spets Aug 4 '11 at 0:45
    
I tested my code and I'm pretty sure it's correct. The loop involving j performs the task of subtracting (a[i] dot e[j])*e[j]. e[j] is defined when j < i. I tried to structure the code to resemble your PDF as much as possible. Btw, please Accept the answer at the end when your original problem is solved. –  Nayuki Minase Aug 4 '11 at 1:30

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