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At page.170 of 'CLR via C#':


public sealed class Program {
    public Int32 GetFive() { return 5; }
    public static void Main() {
       Program p = null;
       Int32 x = p.GetFive(); // In C#, NullReferenceException is thrown
    }
}

Theoretically, the code above is fine. Sure, the variable p is null, but when calling a nonvirtual method (GetFive), the CLR needs to know just the data type of p, which is Program. If GetFive did get called, the value of the this argument would be null. Since the argument is not used inside the GetFive method, no NullReferenceException would be thrown.


Pardon my stupid. I remember that CLR locate really method code by 'this' which always implictly appares at the first argument in method delcare, why it says 'when calling a nonvirtual method (GetFive), the CLR needs to know just the data type of p' ?

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2  
Ummmm what????? –  Jesus Ramos Aug 3 '11 at 5:11
1  
But "GetFive" is an instance method, not a static. Even though you are not using any instance variables inside the "GetFive" method, the runtime still needs to know on which object instance the method is being executed. –  feathj Aug 3 '11 at 5:14
    
@Kirk Woll I think that paragraph is a quote from the book –  saus Aug 3 '11 at 5:19

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The CLR doesn't do null checks for non-virtual methods. Basically, if a method is called with the call instruction, the CLR does not check for a null this pointer. In contrast, the callvirt instruction always checks for nullity. However, C# emits the callvirt instruction whether or not the method is virtual.

What the passage is saying is that if the C# compiler emitted the more semantically appropriate call instruction rather than callvirt instruction for non-virtual methods, then the code in question would not throw a NullReferenceException. As I recall, the compiler team decided to almost always emit the callvirt instruction because it handled versioning better (also the JIT can optimize a callvirt into a call).

See http://www.pvle.be/tag/clr/

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1  
"the compiler team decided to almost always emit the callvirt instruction because it handled versioning better" - the main reason is that C# requires NullReferenceExceptions to be thrown when methods are called on a null reference. The easiest way to do this is to use callvirt (which checks its argument) rather than call. –  Porges Aug 3 '11 at 5:44
1  
Although I too believe the stated rationale is wrong, the C# compiler's use of callvirt for all instance method calls on classes is the correct reason why a NullReferenceException would be thrown here. –  Ben Voigt Aug 3 '11 at 13:20
    
The article you refered is very useful for me. Thanks a lot! –  Domi.Zhang Aug 3 '11 at 16:05

this refers to the current instance of itself (the class).

Your code snippet,

Program p = null;
Int32 x = p.GetFive(); // In C#, NullReferenceException is thrown

does not work because you are trying to call a method GetFive of null, a non-existent instance of Program - in other words, you are trying to knock on a door of a void, a door that does not exist. Since the CLR doesn't know the location of the door, it throws an exception "cannot find function door!" for you - much better than undefined behaviour.

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I think the OP realizes why the nullreferenceexception is thrown in c#, but his question is "why does this passage from 'CLR via C#' say that the CLR doesn't check for null for nonvirtual methods"...EDIT: but then again, looking at the title of the question, I'm not too sure what the question is... –  saus Aug 3 '11 at 5:23

Okay. I just looked up pp. 170 of CLR via C#, 3rd edition.

Perhaps the whole point of the page is the IMPORTANT section whereby another CLR language compiler generates some code that uses your C# class, and then you change your C# code to a non virtual method without also recompiling the code referencing the C# library. In this case, you could have a problem depending on whether the caller implements call or callvirt (it is undefined what that compiler will do).

c# always defaults to callvirt, so no problem there, but for the caller you can't know this ahead of time. If you do this, you could unintentionally break somebody elses program if you are shipping libraries or APIs.


Try this instead.

    public static Int32 GetFive() { return 5; }    
    public static void Main() {       
        Int32 x = GetFive(); 
    }
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