Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

This program should store the number of characters of name in the variable str_length (where name < 50 characters terminated by a ".") I'm baffled as to why this code only spits out the first character, meaning it breaks from the loop when i = 0, for a name such as "Jonathan." Shouldn't it parse through the string until it finds the ".", only then breaking from the for loop?

#include <iostream>
#include <cstring>

using namespace std;

int main()
{

 string name;
 int str_length;

 cout << "What's your name" << endl;

 cin >> name;

 for (int i = 0; i < 50; i++)
 {
     cout << name[i];
     if (name[i] == '.')
        str_length = i;
        break;         
 }

 cout << endl;

 system("PAUSE");

 return 0;  
 }
share|improve this question
4  
Indentation is meaningless in C++. You forgot {} around the body of the if. –  Nemo Aug 3 '11 at 5:35
    
You are reinventing string's find method, though. Also the header to include for std::string is <string>. See cplusplus.com/reference/string/string/find –  UncleBens Aug 3 '11 at 6:34
    
Also you shouldn't assume that the input is at least 50 characters. The string can have any size, and the size() method tells you that. –  UncleBens Aug 3 '11 at 6:37
    
don't forget to accept one of the answers you got –  Ioan Paul Pirau Aug 3 '11 at 21:48

3 Answers 3

You have:

for (int i = 0; i < 50; i++)
{
    cout << name[i];
    if (name[i] == '.')
       str_length = i;
       break;         
}

Which is actually:

for (int i = 0; i < 50; i++)
{
    cout << name[i];

    if (name[i] == '.')
    {
       str_length = i;
    }

    break;         
}

You want:

for (int i = 0; i < 50; i++)
{
    cout << name[i];
    if (name[i] == '.')
    {
       str_length = i;
       break;  
    }       
}

You are breaking at the end of each loop.

share|improve this answer
    
what syntax error? –  Rasel Aug 3 '11 at 5:39
    
wrong terminology. my apologies. –  ssell Aug 3 '11 at 5:41

You are missing {} around if condition. So break is executed without any condition, hence the loop is exited in the first iteration itself.

share|improve this answer

This demonstrates the danger of not using braces even for one line if statements. I suspect you did this:

 if (name[i] == '.')
    str_length = i;

and then added the break later. If you had done this:

 if (name[i] == '.') { 
    str_length = i;
 }

up front, it would have been natural to add the break inside the curly braces, and you wouldn't have had the bug.

share|improve this answer
    
Ah, the subtleties of programming... Thanks guys, it was a very asinine error. –  Chris Aug 3 '11 at 5:41
    
Not asinine! But avoidable through better practices - always use curly braces, even for one-liners so your code is easily modifiable. –  Scott Wilson Aug 3 '11 at 10:35

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.