Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I have the following code:

SN.get_Chars(5)

SN is a string so this should give the 5th Char Ok!

Now i have another code but : SN.get_Chars(0x10)

I wonder what 0x10 is? Is it a number? If it's so, then what is it in decimal notation?

share|improve this question
22  
In google, type "0x10 in decimal". Google calculator will convert them for you – mmcdole Mar 28 '09 at 5:40
    
You can also use the "Any Base Calculator" on the Android market to do this: play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.ewe.radixcalculator – zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz Apr 1 '12 at 19:25
    
You can also use windows calculator in programmer mode! – nldev Nov 13 '13 at 8:20
up vote 29 down vote accepted

0x means the number is hexadecimal, or base 16.

0x10 is 16.

share|improve this answer

0xNNNN (not necessarily four digits) represents, in C at least, a hexadecimal (base-16 because 'hex' is 6 and 'dec' is 10 in Latin-derived languages) number, where N is one of the digits 0 through 9 or A through F (or their lower case equivalents, either representing 10 through 15), and there may be 1 or more of those digits in the number. The other way of representing it is NNNN16.

It's very useful in the computer world as a single hex digit represents four bits (binary digits). That's because four bits, each with two possible values, gives you a total of 2 x 2 x 2 x 2 or 16 (24) values. In other words:

  _____________________________________bits____________________________________
 /                                                                             \
+----+----+----+----+----+----+----+----+----+----+----+----+----+----+----+----+
| bF | bE | bD | bC | bB | bA | b9 | b8 | b7 | b6 | b5 | b4 | b3 | b2 | b1 | b0 |
+----+----+----+----+----+----+----+----+----+----+----+----+----+----+----+----+
 \_________________/ \_________________/ \_________________/ \_________________/ 
      Hex digit           Hex digit           Hex digit           Hex digit

A base-X number is a number where each position represents a multiple of a power of X.


In base 10, which we humans are used to, the digits used are 0 through 9, and the number 730410 is:

  • (7 x 103) = 700010 ; plus
  • (3 x 102) = 30010 ; plus
  • (0 x 101) = 010 ; plus
  • (4 x 100) = 410 ; equals 7304.

In octal, where the digits are 0 through 7. the number 7548 is:

  • (7 x 82) = 44810 ; plus
  • (5 x 81) = 4010 ; plus
  • (4 x 80) = 410 ; equals 49210.

Octal numbers in C are preceded by the character 0 so 0123 is not 123 but is instead (1 * 64) + (2 * 8) + 3, or 83.


In binary, where the digits are 0 and 1. the number 10112 is:

  • (1 x 23) = 810 ; plus
  • (0 x 22) = 010 ; plus
  • (1 x 21) = 210 ; plus
  • (1 x 20) = 110 ; equals 1110.

In hexadecimal, where the digits are 0 through 9 and A through F (which represent the "digits" 10 through 15). the number 7F2416 is:

  • (7 x 163) = 2867210 ; plus
  • (F x 162) = 384010 ; plus
  • (2 x 161) = 3210 ; plus
  • (4 x 160) = 410 ; equals 3254810.

Your relatively simple number 0x10, which is the way C represents 1016, is simply:

  • (1 x 161) = 1610 ; plus
  • (0 x 160) = 010 ; equals 1610.

As an aside, the different bases of numbers are used for many things.

  • base 10 is used, as previously mentioned, by we humans with 10 digits on our hands.
  • base 2 is used by computers due to the relative ease of representing the two binary states with electrical circuits.
  • base 8 is used almost exclusively in UNIX file permissions so that each octal digit represents a 3-tuple of binary permissions (read/write/execute). It's also used in C-based languages and UNIX utilities to inject binary characters into an otherwise printable-character-only data stream.
  • base 16 is a convenient way to represent four bits to a digit, especially as most architectures nowadays have a word size which is a multiple of four bits.
  • base 64 is used in encoding mail so that binary files may be sent using only printable characters. Each digit represents six binary digits so you can pack three eight-bit characters into four six-bit digits (25% increased file size but guaranteed to get through the mail gateways untouched).
  • as a semi-useful snippet, base 60 comes from some very old civilisation (Babylon, Sumeria, Mesopotamia or something like that) and is the source of 60 seconds/minutes in the minute/hour, 360 degrees in a circle, 60 minutes (of arc) in a degree and so on [not really related to the computer industry, but interesting nonetheless].
  • as an even less-useful snippet, the ultimate question and answer in The Hitchhikers Guide To The Galaxy was "What do you get when you multiply 6 by 9?" and "42". Whilst same say this is because the Earth computer was faulty, others see it as proof that the creator has 13 fingers :-)
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for thoroughness and a math lesson, but don't forget poor old base-2 ;-) – Robert Paulson Mar 28 '09 at 6:00
    
base 60 would be babylon. – Ikke Mar 28 '09 at 6:24
    
I don't like to speak authoritatively on things I know little about. It may have been the Babylonians, Sumerians or Mesopotamians - you may just as well say the Iraqis for all I'd know. I'll leave that to the history buffs (my interest in ancient history is adequate but not comprehensive). – paxdiablo Mar 28 '09 at 6:58
    
Iraq doesn't exactly fall under "ancient history", as it was founded in the 20th century :-) – EddieD Mar 28 '09 at 12:18
1  
@Louis: old I am, young padawan, but 5000 years old not am I :-) Check out en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sexagesimal - they seem to think it was because 60 has bucketloads of factors. – paxdiablo Aug 12 '10 at 4:58

It's a hex number and is 16 decimal.

share|improve this answer

Notice that '10' is the representation of the base in that base:

10 is 2(decimal) in base-2

10 is 3(decimal) in base-3

...

10 is 10(decimal) in base-10

...

10 is 16(decimal) in base-16 (hexadecimal)

...

10 is 1024(decimal) in base-1024

...and so on

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.