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A point from the ISO C++ draft (n3290):

3.4.2/3 Argument Dependant Name Lookup:

Let X be the lookup set produced by unqualified lookup (3.4.1) and let Y be the lookup set produced by argument dependent lookup (defined as follows). If X contains

  • a declaration of a class member (#1) or
  • a block-scope function declaration that is not a using-declaration (#2) or
  • a declaration that is neither a function or a function template (#3)

then Y is empty. Otherwise Y is the set of declarations found in the namespaces associated with the argument types as described below. The set of declarations found by the lookup of the name is the union of X and Y.

Is there an example code snippet that demonstrates ADL involving #1, #2 and #3?

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3 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I think this code covers all the cases (also available at http://ideone.com/CbyJv). If you don't select C++0x in ideone, then case #2 is allowed (but gcc 4.5.2 catches it).

#include <iostream>

// ::f
void f (int i) { std::cout << "::f\n" ; }

// Simple case
void OK1() {
  f (99) ; // Calls ::f
}

// Argument-dependend lookup
namespace MyNamespace {
struct S { int i ; } ;
void f (S& s) { std::cout << "MyNamespace::f\n" ; }
}

void OK2() {
  MyNamespace::S s ;
  f (99) ;   // Calls ::f
  f (s) ;    // Calls MyNamespace::f because the type of s is declared in MyNamespace
}

// Declaration of a class member (#1)
struct C {
  static void ERROR1() {
    MyNamespace::S s ;
    f (s) ;        // Error: MyNamespace::f not matched, because Y is empty (#1)
  }
  static void f() { // Declaration of a class member (#1)
    std::cout << "C::f\n" ;
  }
} ;

// Block-scope function declaration (#2)
void ERROR2() {
  void f() ; // Block-scope function declaration (#2)
  MyNamespace::S s ;
  f (s) ;    // Error: MyNamespace::f not matched, because Y is empty (#2)
}

// Declaration that is neither a function or a function template (#3)
void ERROR3() {
  MyNamespace::S s ;
  f (s) ;            // OK: MyNamespace::f called
  typedef int f[3] ; // Declaration that is neither a function or a function template (#3)
  f (s) ;            // Error: MyNamespace::f not matched, because Y is empty (#3). This is an initialiser
}
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Number 1 is pretty simple - if you look for a name N inside a class, and the class has a member N, that's it! You don't have to go looking anywhere else.

Number 2 I believe is similar, but inside a block

{
    void f(double);

    f(42);
}

the code will try to call the function f declared there, if possible, and give up otherwise.

Number 3 is again similar. If you look for the name N and find something with that name that is not a function, you don't have to go looking for overloads.

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For what it's worth, this is also called a Koenig Lookup. I don't have examples for all 3 to hand, but Bo Persson has already provided some.

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