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Why won't this work?

I would like it to print every second.

Thanks.

import java.awt.event.ActionEvent;
import java.awt.event.ActionListener;
import javax.swing.Timer;

public class test2 {

public static void main(String[] args) {

    Timer timer = new Timer(1000, new ActionListener() {
        public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e) {
            System.out.println("hello");
        }
    });

    timer.start();
    }
}
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possible duplicate of Why Timer does not work if we do not generate a window? –  Grodriguez Aug 3 '11 at 7:51

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Your program terminates before the timer can run even once. When the main method is terminated the program terminates and all threads will also terminate. This includes your timer thread.

Try the following:

import java.awt.event.ActionEvent;
import java.awt.event.ActionListener;
import javax.swing.Timer;

public class test2 {

    public static void main(String[] args) {

        Timer timer = new Timer(1000, new ActionListener() {
            public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e) {
                System.out.println("hello");
            }
        });

        timer.start();
        }

        while (true) /* no operation */;
    }
}
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the while(true) fixes the problem, thanks –  Ricco Aug 3 '11 at 8:01

Probably the timer is started in a daemon thread, and immediately after starting it, the main thread finishes.

As soon as there are only daemon threads left, the JVM may/must terminate. So you need to keep the main thread alive. For testing purposes a simple Thread.sleep(10000); should do well.

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Your answer is conceptually correct, however note that swing timers do not run on a separate daemon thread. Rather they are checked from the event dispatch thread. –  Grodriguez Aug 3 '11 at 7:54
    
Thanks for the correction. I haven't been working with Swing for seven years. ;) –  Roland Illig Aug 3 '11 at 7:55

There's nothing preventing your code from exiting immediately after the call to start. Add Thread.sleep(10000); after timer.start(); and you'll see the message printed.

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1  
but doesn't thread.sleep pause the entire program? –  Ricco Aug 3 '11 at 7:59
    
No, it pauses the current thread. –  Grodriguez Aug 3 '11 at 8:01

Because your program will exit soon after main thread is finished, and since timer runs on a separate thread it won't have time to execute. Adding a Thead.Sleep call before main method end would execute your code.

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You are using interface libraries (java.awt) to write console applications.

Try this:

public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception {
     while(true){
         Thread.sleep(1000);
         System.out.println("hello");
     }
}
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3  
This might be a starting point for a GUI application, reduced to the minimum amount of code that doesn't work as expected. –  Roland Illig Aug 3 '11 at 7:46

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