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How can I get in c# the CPU frequency (example : 2Ghz) ? It's simple but I don't find it in the environnement variables. Thanks :)

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1  
Which frequency do you mean? The current one, or the maximum? – CodesInChaos Aug 3 '11 at 8:41
    
I mean the maximum – Eärion Aug 3 '11 at 8:42
up vote 8 down vote accepted
 var searcher = new ManagementObjectSearcher(
            "select MaxClockSpeed from Win32_Processor");
 foreach (var item in searcher.Get())
 {
      var clockSpeed = (uint)item["MaxClockSpeed"];
 }

if you wish to get other fields look at class Win32_processor

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It works fine :D I get the frequency in Hz – Eärion Aug 3 '11 at 9:15
    
You were expecting it to be in Ghz? – Ramhound Aug 3 '11 at 11:45
1  
seems to return in MHz MaxClockSpeed Data type: uint32 Access type: Read-only Qualifiers: Units (MegaHertz) – kenny Jun 2 '15 at 20:12
    
I did this to convert it, var clockSpeed = 0.001f * (uint)item["MaxClockSpeed"]; – Brad Moore Dec 16 '15 at 1:16

Try this code

using System.Management;

uint currentsp , Maxsp;
public void CPUSpeed()
{
   using(ManagementObject Mo = new ManagementObject("Win32_Processor.DeviceID='CPU0'"))
   {
       currentsp = (uint)(Mo["CurrentClockSpeed"]);
       Maxsp = (uint)(Mo["MaxClockSpeed"]);
   }
}

I get it from Here

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1  
CurrentClockSpeed sounds like the current one, not the maximum :) – Matten Aug 3 '11 at 8:47
1  
you should use a dispose statement. using(ManagementObject Mo = new ManagementObject("Win32_Processor.DeviceID='CPU0'")) { ... } – nakhli Aug 3 '11 at 8:51
3  
@Matten just replace CurrentClockSpeed by MaxClockSpeed and you are done – nakhli Aug 3 '11 at 8:53
2  
@Chaker Nakhli -- ok, then this is the preferable solution – Matten Aug 3 '11 at 8:55
    
@Matten you should upvote my comment then :P – nakhli Aug 3 '11 at 8:58

One could take the information out of the registry, but dunno if it works on Windows XP or older (mine is Windows 7).

HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE/HARDWARE/DESCRIPTION/CentralProcessor/0/ProcessorName 

reads like

Intel(R) Core(TM)2 Quad CPU    Q6600  @ 2.40GHz

for me.

Something like this code could retrieve the information (not tested):

RegistryKey processor_name = Registry.LocalMachine.OpenSubKey(@"Hardware\Description\System\CentralProcessor\0", RegistryKeyPermissionCheck.ReadSubTree);  


if (processor_name != null)
{
  if (processor_name.GetValue("ProcessorNameString") != null)
  {
    string value = processor_name.GetValue("ProcessorNameString");
    string freq = value.Split('@')[1];
    ...
  }
}

(source: here)

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You can get it via WMI, but it's quite slow so if you're going to be getting it on more than one occasion I'd suggest you cache it - something like:

namespace Helpers
{
    using System.Management;

    public static class HardwareHelpers
    {
        private static uint? maxCpuSpeed = null;
        public static uint MaxCpuSpeed
        {
            get
            {
                return maxCpuSpeed.HasValue ? maxCpuSpeed.Value : (maxCpuSpeed = GetMaxCpuSpeed()).Value;
            }
        }

        private static uint GetMaxCpuSpeed()
        {
            using (var managementObject = new ManagementObject("Win32_Processor.DeviceID='CPU0'"))
            {
                var sp = (uint)(managementObject["MaxClockSpeed"]);

                return sp;
            }
        }
    }
}
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