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I find Java's exception hierarchy confusing. Throwable is divided into Error and Exception, and RuntimeException inherits from Exception.

  1. Error is an unchecked exception. Why doesn't Error inherit from RuntimeException then?

  2. Exception is a checked exception. RuntimeException is an unchecked exception, yet it inherits from Exception. Doesn't this violate the Liskov-Substitution-Principle?

Wouldn't it make more sense if Throwable were divided into Exception (checked) and RuntimeException (unchecked), and Error would inherit from RuntimeExeption?

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Mainly, i think they wanted to separate Error and Exception terms. Error means something fatal happened. And exception is some condition which changes the flow of program, undesired. Might be, afterwards they added RuntimeException, which is unchecked... –  Paarth Aug 3 '11 at 9:49

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I find Java's exception hierarchy confusing. Throwable is divided into Error and Exception, and RuntimeException inherits from Exception.

A Throwable is anything that can be used to unwind the call stack. This should include some VM level fault (flagged by an Error) and something application specific (flagged by an Exception)

Error is an unchecked exception. Why doesn't Error inherit from RuntimeException then?

Simply because Errors are not Exceptions. There wouldn't be any point in actually "catching" an Error. For eg. What would you do after catching an OutOfMemoryError. Errors are meant to flag something seriously happened at the VM level which is not necessarily handle-able by the programmer

Exception is a checked exception. RuntimeException is an unchecked exception, yet it inherits from Exception. Doesn't this violate the Liskov-Substitution-Principle?

Not really. What the implementors were trying to say was that Exceptions MUST always be checked. Your code will be cleaner if all your methods declare what sort of application/library Exceptions they throw. RuntimeExceptions should only be thrown in case of more general / dynamic situations such as a NullPointerException where the developer might not have coded for the case but is a serious bug which is not exactly something mentioned in the application spec.

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The design of exception handling in the two most popular object-oriented frameworks (Java and .NET) is predicated upon the notion that the question of whether to handle a particular exception should depend primarily upon its type, and that the types of exceptions one will want to catch are going to have a hierarchical class relationship. I think Java and .NET do things that way because C++ did it that way, and C++ did it that way because of a desire to avoid hard-wiring any non-primitive types hard-coded into the language. In the absence of a hard-coded type to which all exceptions may be cast, it's impossible for a catch statement to know anything about any exception type for which it is not explicitly prepared. If it will only make sense to catch exceptions one can decode, a catch statement will be able to sensibly act upon those types, and only those types, which derive from the one in the statement.

In retrospect, it probably would have been better to have the decisions of what exceptions should be acted upon and/or resolved by particular catch statements be determined by some means other than the class hierarchy. Among other things, a single attempt to invoke a method may fail because of multiple problems; if that happens, every catch which is associated with any of those problems should trigger, but only when all of the problems have been resolved should normal execution resume. Unfortunately, neither Java nor .NET has any mechanism to achieve such behavior.

With regard to the top-level layout of the hierarchy, I think there was an assumption that every kind of exception that might be thrown by a method would either always be expected by the immediate calling code or never expected by any calling code. Exceptions of the latter type were classified under Error or RuntimeException, while those of the former type were placed elsewhere. In practice, the question of whether an exception is expected by a method's caller should be independent of its place in the hierarchy or even the exception type. The fact that a method is declared as throws FooException does not mean that calling code is always going to expect that the exception could occur. It's very common for code to call a method which is declared as throwing an exception but believe that the circumstances surrounding the call are such that in practice that the particular call won't ever throw.. If the exception does occur, it should behave like an unexpected exception, even if an outer execution context is expecting to catch an exception of that type. Unfortunately, the exception handling mechanisms are what they are, and I don't expect any major overhaul.

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I think that even better hierarchy is

Throwable Exception CheckedException RuntimeException Error

This hierarchy separates Exceptions and Errors (as @Paarth said) and makes it possible to catch all checked exceptions only (without runtime exceptions). But it seems that James Gosling thought different...

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  1. Error is not a subclass of Exception because it is not meant to catch (Once an error is occurred usually the program is no longer expected to function). So error should have more higher place in hierarchy as I believe.

  2. It should not violate Liskov substitution because RuntimeException can be catched if you want, but only it's not enforced.

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