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Is it possible to restore table to last time with data if all data was deleted accidentally.

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6  
backups?......... –  Mitch Wheat Aug 3 '11 at 10:11
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Welcome to the world of databses. You forget a WHERE and you lose everything –  Tom Squires Aug 3 '11 at 10:13

7 Answers 7

up vote 17 down vote accepted

There is another solution, if you have binary logs active on your server you can use mysqlbinlog

generate a sql file with it

mysqlbinlog binary_log_file > query_log.sql

then search for your missing rows. If you don't have it active, no other solution. Make backups next time.

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Good point - note that this might not include all your data, and you need to have had binary logging on before the accident (which is not the default). –  Piskvor Aug 3 '11 at 10:17
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For more information: see dev.mysql.com –  M_rk Aug 3 '11 at 10:17
    
Path of binary_log_files? Where will these files be stored? –  Sim Jul 10 '13 at 10:38
    
See also Point-in-time recovery –  olafure Oct 15 '13 at 14:48

Sort of. Using phpMyAdmin I just deleted one row too many. But I caught it before I proceeded and had most of the data from the delete confirmation message. I was able to rebuild the record. But the confirmation message truncated some of a text comment.

Someone more knowledgeable than I regarding phpMyAdmin may know of a setting so that you can get a more complete echo of the delete confirmation message. With a complete delete message available, if you slow down and catch your error, you can restore the whole record.

(PS This app also sends an email of the submission that creates the record. If the client has a copy, I will be able to restore the record completely)

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As Mitch mentioned, backing data up is the best method.

However, it maybe possible to extract the lost data partially depending on the situation or DB server used. For most part, you are out of luck if you don't have any backup.

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I'm sorry, bu it's not posible, unless you made a backup file earlier.

EDIT: Actually it is possible, but it gets very tricky and you shouldn't think about it if data wasn't really, really important. You see: when data get's deleted from a computer it still remains in the same place on the disk, only its sectors are marked as empty. So data remains intact, except if it gets overwritten by new data. There are several programs designed for this purpose and there are companies who specialize in data recovery, though they are rather expensive.

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No this is not possible. The only solution will be to have regular backups. This is very important.

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Unfortunately, no. If you were running the server in default config, go get your backups (you have backups, right?) - generally, a database doesn't keep previous versions of your data, or a revision of changes: only the current state.

(Alternately, if you have deleted the data through a custom frontend, it is quite possible that the frontend doesn't actually issue a DELETE: many tables have a is_deleted field or similar, and this is simply toggled by the frontend. Note that this is a "soft delete" implemented in the frontend app - the data is not actually deleted in such cases; if you actually issued a DELETE, TRUNCATE or a similar SQL command, this is not applicable.)

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For InnoDB tables, Percona has a recovery tool which may help. It is far from fail-safe or perfect, and how fast you stopped your MySQL server after the accidental deletes has a major impact. If you're quick enough, changes are you can recover quite a bit of data, but recovering all data is nigh impossible.

Of cours, proper daily backups, binlogs, and possibly a replication slave (which won't help for accidental deletes but does help in case of hardware failure) are the way to go, but this tool could enable you to save as much data as possible when you did not have those yet.

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