Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Consider the following case:

class A {
  int x;
  int y;
}

class B extends A {
  int z;
}

Now, somewhere in the code this classes are used like this:

A objA = getAFromSomewhere();
B objB = null;

And in a certain situation I want to do something like

objB = objA; // can't do this
objB.z = someZ;

Of course the real objects are a bit more complicated, so it's not just about copying two ints. But they aren't overly complex either.

I know I can write a constructor for B like this:

public B(A anA) {
  this.a = anA.a;
  this.b = anA.b;

  this.z = 0;
}

But if that's really the only way, I prefer merging the additional members of B into A.

update considering the answers

My question was not clear enough. I understand that objB = objA; can't work (thus I asked for "something like", meaning something with comparable code complexity) and I know about the issues with shallow vs deep copies.
What I was looking for is a possibility to copy the members of a base class (let's say using clone()). You may understand that copying every member manually is a bad solution as it adds complexity and redundancy to the code. Thanks for your replies anyway!

share|improve this question

6 Answers 6

up vote 7 down vote accepted

There's no trivial solution to this because there's no one-size-fits-all solution. Basically you don't have all the information within a B, so you can't guarantee you would have a "sensible" B object.

You probably just want to create a constructor in B which takes an A and copies all the A data into the new B.

share|improve this answer
    
I've modified my question to take this into account. Looks like there really is no elegant solution –  didi_X8 Aug 3 '11 at 10:31
    
@didi_X8: Indeed - but it's important that you understand why there's no general elegant solution. For example, what would it mean if I were to be able to write: Object x = "Hello"; FileOutputStream stream = x;? –  Jon Skeet Aug 3 '11 at 10:34
    
"You probably just want to create a constructor in B which takes an A and copies all the A data into the new B." Yes, that's exactly what I wanted. But without mentioning every member of A seperately. –  didi_X8 Aug 3 '11 at 10:49
    
@didi_X8: Right... unfortunately I don't believe there's a simple way of doing that. (In your case they're ints, but imagine if they were objects... shallow or deep copy? It becomes tricky, basically...) –  Jon Skeet Aug 3 '11 at 10:53
    
In my case they are objects (just used ints in this example), but a shallow copy would be ok. Still there seems to be no way to shortcut with clone(). –  didi_X8 Aug 3 '11 at 13:31

There is a (relatively) trivial solution!

Implement a constructor in class B that takes an instance of class A and copies the fields.

One of the reasons there's no generic solution in the language itself is because of the problem of deep copying.

For example, if the source object contains further Objects, as opposed to plain types, what would the generic copy operator do? Just copy the reference (giving a shallow copy), or make real copies?

What then if one of those objects is a Collection? Should it also copy every element of the collection, too?

The only logical conclusion would be to perform a shallow copy, but then you haven't really got a copy at all.

share|improve this answer

I am shocked too. :)

You really cannot do this: objB = objA;. Because Renault and BMW are cars but not all cars are BMW.

Thank about A as Car, B as BMW.

Now you say:

Car car = new Renault();
BMV bmv = car;  // you cannot do this. This is exactly your case. 
share|improve this answer
    
I understand that I can't do this, that's not the problem. I just wondered if there's no straightforward way to say (in a constructor): copy all shared (base class) parts from the "source" obj (whatever it be) and separately initialize the additional (BMW) ones. –  didi_X8 Aug 3 '11 at 10:33

...not because this is what people should do but more because I felt like a challenge, here is some test code which does a simple copy of the objects (using setter and getter methods):

import java.lang.reflect.Method;
import org.junit.Test;

public class ObjectUtils {
    @Test
    public void test() {
        A a = new A();
        B b = new B();
        a.setX(1);
        a.setY(2);
        this.copyProperties(a, b);
    }
    private void copyProperties(Object obja, Object objb) {
        Method m[] = obja.getClass().getDeclaredMethods();
        for(int i=0;i<m.length;i++) {
            try {
                String name = m[i].getName();
                if(name.startsWith("get") || name.startsWith("is")) {
                    Class rtype = m[i].getReturnType();
                    String setter = name.replaceFirst("^(get|is)","set");
                    Class s = objb.getClass();
                    Method method = s.getMethod(setter,rtype);
                    Object[] args = new Object[1];
                    args[0] = m[i].invoke(obja);
                    method.invoke(objb,args[0]);
                }
            } catch(Exception e) {
                e.printStackTrace();
            }
        }
    }
    class A {
        int x;
        int y;
        /**
         * @return the x
         */
        public int getX() {
            return x;
        }
        /**
         * @param x the x to set
         */
        public void setX(int x) {
            this.x = x;
        }
        /**
         * @return the y
         */
        public int getY() {
            return y;
        }
        /**
         * @param y the y to set
         */
        public void setY(int y) {
            this.y = y;
        }       
    }
    class B extends A {
        int z;
        /**
         * @return the z
         */
        public int getZ() {
            return z;
        }
        /**
         * @param z the z to set
         */
        public void setZ(int z) {
            this.z = z;
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Perhaps you could do this:

class A {
    int x;
    int y;

    A(A a) {
        this.x = a.x;
        this.y = a.y;
    }
}

class B extends A {
    int z;

    B(A a) {
        super(a);
        z = 0;
    }
}

You're still listing every field, but only once per class.

share|improve this answer

I think best way is to use a factory method to create B objects from A objects.

class BFactory
{
    public static B createB(A a)
    {
     B b = new B();
     copy(a,b);

     return b;
    }

    private static <X,Y> void copy(X src,Y dest) throws Exception
    {
        List<Field> aFields = getAllFields(src.getClass());
        List<Field> bFields = getAllFields(dest.getClass());

        for (Field aField : aFields) {
            aField.setAccessible(true);
            for (Field bField : bFields) {
                bField.setAccessible(true);
                if (aField.getName().equals(bField.getName()))
                {
                    bField.set(dest, aField.get(src));
                }
            }
        }
    }

    private static List<Field> getAllFields(Class type)
    {
        ArrayList<Field> allFields = new ArrayList<Field>();
        while (type != Object.class)
        {
            Collections.addAll(allFields, type.getDeclaredFields());
            type = type.getSuperclass();
        }
        return allFields;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Downvoted because the answer doesn't take into account the question: the question is basically saying "how can I avoid mentioning every single member A and B have in common? –  spaceCamel Mar 7 '13 at 11:46

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.