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I have inherited a large existing website to maintain. Previous developers have taken an erratic approach to project structure, and so one of the things I have been spending time working on is refactoring everything to make it more maintainable - for instance, gathering various copy-pasted blocks of html and code into usercontrols, setting everything up to derive from a master page, and generally spinning stuff off to live in libraries, rather than having functionality duplicated all over the place.

That was with the server side code. I now turn my focus to the client side functionality. The javascript at the moment is pretty bad. It suffers from a lot of the problems of the serverside code - there is a lot of duplicated functionality, unused functions, buggy functions, and so on, so I want to redo a lot of it. All the javascript code is stored in separate .js files. Often, it seems to duplicate functionality that could come from using asp.net controls instead, like the various validators.

I've not worked much with web techonologies before, but my instincts tell me that if I am going to be working with asp.net, I should be building my code with the tools provided by asp.net as much as possible. For instance, using stuff like RegisterClientScriptBlock to structure my code.

I previously asked a question related to this subject, but the responses I got were more about structuring javascript than about structuring an asp.net website.

What is the best, easiest to develop and most maintainable way to use javascript with an asp.net website?

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Often, it seems to duplicate functionality that could come from using asp.net controls instead, like the various validators. I've not worked much with web techonologies before, but my instincts tell me that if I am going to be working with asp.net, (...) using stuff like RegisterClientScriptBlock to structure my code. - I do not agree. Asp.net adds a lot of overhead javascript that can be extremely easily avoided with a single line of JQuery; thereby making the page load way faster. I guess it depends on individual's preference. –  iamserious Aug 3 '11 at 11:03
    
@iamserious I've not really worked with web technologies before, so I'm open to any suggestions. Incidentally, the site is currently setup to use mootools rather than JQuery. –  Oliver Aug 3 '11 at 11:05
    
do you have any experience with MooTools or JQuery? I am a fan of JQuery, although, I started with asp.net framework for everything (ajax extentions for simple silly things like tabs or collapsible panels) - Once I found out how easy it is to achieve these with JQuery - without all the extra overhead of asp.net, I ditched asp.net framework to do as much work as I could on js –  iamserious Aug 3 '11 at 11:13
    
The advert for this job asked for a developer experienced in java and c. Apparently the owner didn't understand the difference between c/c# java/javascript. So I'm pretty much learning everything as I go. If it works as nicely as you say, I'll focus my effforts more on the javascript stuff. –  Oliver Aug 3 '11 at 11:16
    
ouch! good luck to you buddy. –  iamserious Aug 3 '11 at 11:42

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

RegisterClientScriptBlock is one the things you start trying in the first place and regret it soon. Javascript does not belong onto the server side. Totally not.

You really should use Separate Javascript files to wrap each control using the way microsoft creates their client side stuff. The problem is, even MSDN refers a lot to server-side code generation.

A good introduction about client side asp.net development can be found here: http://dotnetslackers.com/articles/ajax/ASPNETAJAXControlDevelopment.aspx

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Make small incremental improvements to the javascript through best practice. Where possible wrap these changes in tests. Watch the videos available online regarding WebForms and how to overcome some of the technologies shortcomings.

Remember that WebForms isn't dead, it's not legacy and it has a future. However, it was developed in the days when abstracting the web (specifically HTTP) was considered the way forward but nowadays we embrace HTTP and our development approach has shifted as a result. There's a lot of community support out there for WebForms development in the "new world".

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to make the site easy to maintain make it n-tier

http://www.developerfusion.com/article/3058/boosting-your-net-application-performance/2/

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He specifically asked how he can make his javascript more maintainable, not the overall application. And converting this to N-tier does not solve his current itch with his javascript-mess. –  Sebastian P.R. Gingter Aug 3 '11 at 11:28

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