Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have two same conditions and i want to know which is well in perfomance ?

if(str_final.charAt(str_final.length() -1) == 'a'
    || str_final.charAt(str_final.length() -1) == 'b' )
{
    // body 
}

--------------------OR--------------------

char temp = str_final.charAt(str_final.length() -1);
if( temp == 'a' || temp == 'b')
{
    // body
}
share|improve this question
8  
The real question is which is more readable? :) –  Adam Paynter Aug 3 '11 at 11:44
12  
Talking about readable ... How about ... .endsWith("a") ? –  giraff Aug 3 '11 at 11:46
2  
Caring about performance for such a miniscule detail is like mowing the lawn with a nail scissor. –  Jacob Aug 3 '11 at 11:47
    
Yup Thanks to all... i was just thinkin about the memory as i had created a temp variable and i had many such or conditions in a single if... Now i think the second is much better , its worth creatin a variable... thanks to all again... –  Vins Aug 3 '11 at 13:07
1  
If you create even one object it will be more than 10x more expensive than operations like this. I would suggest you profile your application first, and maybe reducing the number of objects you create. –  Peter Lawrey Aug 3 '11 at 13:30

9 Answers 9

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Second option would be faster and also much more readable, however better to use some other name than 'temp'

share|improve this answer

The second version is a tiny little bit faster.

Reason:
2 method calls less (if it doesn't end with 'a').
But both do not much more than return variable;:

  • charAt() is only an access to a array, and
  • the length() of the string is already pre-computed as well.
share|improve this answer

Second code is better option as str_final.charAt(str_final.length() -1) is just performed once in worst case also.

char temp = str_final.charAt(str_final.length() -1);

if( temp == 'a' || temp == 'b')
{
  // body
}

In the other case str_final.charAt(str_final.length() -1) has to be performed twice.

share|improve this answer

It might be the same performance, as an optimizing compiler (or just in time compiler/hotspot) could change the 1st version to the 2nd at compile time.

share|improve this answer
1  
This is true. And even if it doesn't, the next generation of the compiler might do this. –  Stephen C Aug 3 '11 at 12:23

I would go for the second option because it is easier to read. Also str_final.length() and str_final.charAt() are only called once.

In addition, instead of calling the char temp, call it something more meaningful like lastChar.

You might even consider using a switch statement if you have more than just two characters to check:

char lastChar = str_final.charAt(str_final.length() -1);
switch (lastChar) {
  case 'a':
  case 'b':
    //do something
    break;
  case 'c':
    //something else
    break;
  case 'd':
    //something else
    break;
}
share|improve this answer
    
obviously i'll call it last_char but just here i named so ...sorry:) –  Vins Aug 3 '11 at 13:00
    
in Java, the convention is to use camelCase –  dogbane Aug 3 '11 at 13:40

The second piece of code is faster because .charAt and .length() are evaluated only once. As others pointed out, readability is clearly more important though, which is also favouring the second solution.

share|improve this answer
    
I am curious to find out what machine code is emitted by HotSpot for the scenario with two calls to charAt and length... –  Adam Paynter Aug 3 '11 at 11:52
    
Good question, though... –  Lukas Eder Aug 3 '11 at 11:53

Is this a catch question? I would certainly prefer the second construct because it's way more readable, and probably performs better.

The compiler can easily optimize temporary variables away, but cannot determine if a function call has sideeffects. So the double function call cannot be optimized to one single call.

share|improve this answer

The second one can't be slower, so I suppose I'd say the second one, as it avoids a method call at least. But, the JIT is going to inline this. The performance difference is going to be all but negligible unless this is in a very tight loop.

I personally find the second more readable as well (perhaps if you called the variable something other than 'temp'). So I'd vote for it on those grounds. But that's the better question here I think: which is clearer? Worry about performance when you have any reason to believe this is code matters.

share|improve this answer

Second version better, though it has a tiny performance than first, it also has couple of advantages 1. Readability 2. Maintenance - For this type of code, suppose if you have to check for more conditions(say 10), then to change the logic, just one place.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.