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I am looking for a way to quickly remove items from a C# List<T>. The documentation states that the List.Remove() and List.RemoveAt() operations are both O(n)

This is severely affecting my application.

I wrote a few different remove methods and tested them all on a List<String> with 500,000 items. The test cases are shown below...


Overview

I wrote a method that would generate a list of strings that simply contains string representations of each number ("1", "2", "3", ...). I then attempted to remove every 5th item in the list. Here is the method used to generate the list:

private List<String> GetList(int size)
{
    List<String> myList = new List<String>();
    for (int i = 0; i < size; i++)
        myList.Add(i.ToString());
    return myList;
}

Test 1: RemoveAt()

Here is the test I used to test the RemoveAt() method.

private void RemoveTest1(ref List<String> list)
{
     for (int i = 0; i < list.Count; i++)
         if (i % 5 == 0)
             list.RemoveAt(i);
}

Test 2: Remove()

Here is the test I used to test the Remove() method.

private void RemoveTest2(ref List<String> list)
{
     List<int> itemsToRemove = new List<int>();
     for (int i = 0; i < list.Count; i++)
        if (i % 5 == 0)
             list.Remove(list[i]);
}

Test 3: Set to null, sort, then RemoveRange

In this test, I looped through the list one time and set the to-be-removed items to null. Then, I sorted the list (so null would be at the top), and removed all the items at the top that were set to null. NOTE: This reordered my list, so I may have to go put it back in the correct order.

private void RemoveTest3(ref List<String> list)
{
    int numToRemove = 0;
    for (int i = 0; i < list.Count; i++)
    {
        if (i % 5 == 0)
        {
            list[i] = null;
            numToRemove++;
        }
    }
    list.Sort();
    list.RemoveRange(0, numToRemove);
    // Now they're out of order...
}

Test 4: Create a new list, and add all of the "good" values to the new list

In this test, I created a new list, and added all of my keep-items to the new list. Then, I put all of these items into the original list.

private void RemoveTest4(ref List<String> list)
{
   List<String> newList = new List<String>();
   for (int i = 0; i < list.Count; i++)
   {
      if (i % 5 == 0)
         continue;
      else
         newList.Add(list[i]);
   }

   list.RemoveRange(0, list.Count);
   list.AddRange(newList);
}

Test 5: Set to null and then FindAll()

In this test, I set all the to-be-deleted items to null, then used the FindAll() feature to find all the items that are not null

private void RemoveTest5(ref List<String> list)
{
    for (int i = 0; i < list.Count; i++)
       if (i % 5 == 0)
           list[i] = null;
    list = list.FindAll(x => x != null);
}

Test 6: Set to null and then RemoveAll()

In this test, I set all the to-be-deleted items to null, then used the RemoveAll() feature to remove all the items that are not null

private void RemoveTest6(ref List<String> list)
{
    for (int i = 0; i < list.Count; i++)
        if (i % 5 == 0)
            list[i] = null;
    list.RemoveAll(x => x == null);
}

Client Application and Outputs

int numItems = 500000;
Stopwatch watch = new Stopwatch();

// List 1...
watch.Start();
List<String> list1 = GetList(numItems);
watch.Stop(); Console.WriteLine(watch.Elapsed.ToString());

watch.Reset(); watch.Start();
RemoveTest1(ref list1);
watch.Stop(); Console.WriteLine(watch.Elapsed.ToString());
Console.WriteLine();

// List 2...
watch.Start();
List<String> list2 = GetList(numItems);
watch.Stop(); Console.WriteLine(watch.Elapsed.ToString());

watch.Reset(); watch.Start();
RemoveTest2(ref list2);
watch.Stop(); Console.WriteLine(watch.Elapsed.ToString());
Console.WriteLine();

// List 3...
watch.Reset(); watch.Start();
List<String> list3 = GetList(numItems);
watch.Stop(); Console.WriteLine(watch.Elapsed.ToString());

watch.Reset(); watch.Start();
RemoveTest3(ref list3);
watch.Stop(); Console.WriteLine(watch.Elapsed.ToString());
Console.WriteLine();

// List 4...
watch.Reset(); watch.Start();
List<String> list4 = GetList(numItems);
watch.Stop(); Console.WriteLine(watch.Elapsed.ToString());

watch.Reset(); watch.Start();
RemoveTest4(ref list4);
watch.Stop(); Console.WriteLine(watch.Elapsed.ToString());
Console.WriteLine();

// List 5...
watch.Reset(); watch.Start();
List<String> list5 = GetList(numItems);
watch.Stop(); Console.WriteLine(watch.Elapsed.ToString());

watch.Reset(); watch.Start();
RemoveTest5(ref list5);
watch.Stop(); Console.WriteLine(watch.Elapsed.ToString());
Console.WriteLine();

// List 6...
watch.Reset(); watch.Start();
List<String> list6 = GetList(numItems);
watch.Stop(); Console.WriteLine(watch.Elapsed.ToString());

watch.Reset(); watch.Start();
RemoveTest6(ref list6);
watch.Stop(); Console.WriteLine(watch.Elapsed.ToString());
Console.WriteLine();

Results

00:00:00.1433089   // Create list
00:00:32.8031420   // RemoveAt()

00:00:32.9612512   // Forgot to reset stopwatch :(
00:04:40.3633045   // Remove()

00:00:00.2405003   // Create list
00:00:01.1054731   // Null, Sort(), RemoveRange()

00:00:00.1796988   // Create list
00:00:00.0166984   // Add good values to new list

00:00:00.2115022   // Create list
00:00:00.0194616   // FindAll()

00:00:00.3064646   // Create list
00:00:00.0167236   // RemoveAll()

Notes And Comments

  • The first two tests do not actually remove every 5th item from the list, because the list is being reordered after each remove. In fact, out of 500,000 items, only 83,334 were removed (should have been 100,000). I am okay with this - clearly the Remove()/RemoveAt() methods are not a good idea anyway.

  • Although I tried to remove the 5th item from the list, in reality there will not be such a pattern. Entries to be removed will be random.

  • Although I used a List<String> in this example, that will not always be the case. It could be a List<Anything>

  • Not putting the items in the list to begin with is not an option.

  • The other methods (3 - 6) all performed much better, comparatively, however I am a little concerned -- In 3, 5, and 6 I was forced to set a value to null, and then remove all the items according to this sentinel. I don't like that approach because I can envision a scenario where one of the items in the list might be null and it would get removed unintentionally.

My question is: What is the best way to quickly remove many items from a List<T>? Most of the approaches I've tried look really ugly, and potentially dangerous, to me. Is a List the wrong data structure?

Right now, I am leaning towards creating a new list and adding the good items to the new list, but it seems like there should be a better way.

Thanks.

share|improve this question
3  
Do you have to actually use List<T>? Unless you need random access, LinkedList<T> might be a better bet. –  Jon Skeet Aug 3 '11 at 12:40
1  
If you could shed some light on what the actual problem you're trying to solve is we would be able to take your described approach into account. Potentially suggesting a different approach solving your issue. So what does the list accomplish for you? –  Rune FS Aug 3 '11 at 12:49
    
@Jon Skeet: Thanks. No, I don't have to use a List. I was not familiar with LinkedList, I had always used List for everything, so I'll definitely look into that. Rune FS: I actually am removing strings from a list based on user input (the user selects which items to remove by checking boxes in a list). But I tried to make this question as generic as I could. –  user807566 Aug 3 '11 at 16:26
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5 Answers

up vote 15 down vote accepted

List isn't an efficient data structure when it comes to removal. You would do better to use a double linked list (LinkedList) as removal simply requires reference updates in the adjacent entries.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. I will look into the LinkedList. What are the major cons? –  user807566 Aug 3 '11 at 16:30
2  
A Linked List is fast to remove and fast to insert, once the desired location has been found. But in order to locate an element, it is necessary to walk the list (from either end). But since data does not have to be relocated, it is still much quicker for insertion or removal than using List. Importantly though, LinkedList, like List, does preserve order. –  Steve Morgan Aug 3 '11 at 16:35
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I feel a HashSet, LinkedList or Dictionary will do you much better.

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If you're happy creating a new list, you don't have to go through setting items to null. For example:

// This overload of Where provides the index as well as the value. Unless
// you need the index, use the simpler overload which just provides the value.
List<string> newList = oldList.Where((value, index) => index % 5 != 0)
                              .ToList();

However, you might want to look at alternative data structures, such as LinkedList<T> or HashSet<T>. It really depends on what features you need from your data structure.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, I was not familiar with the LinkedList, so that may be a better option for me. Thanks for the code sample, too - don't know if I'll use it in this case, but it's nice to know you can do that. –  user807566 Aug 3 '11 at 16:28
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Ok try RemoveAll used like this

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    Stopwatch watch = new Stopwatch();
    watch.Start();
    List<Int32> test = GetList(500000);
    watch.Stop(); Console.WriteLine(watch.Elapsed.ToString());
    watch.Reset(); watch.Start();
    test.RemoveAll( t=> t % 5 == 0);
    List<String> test2 = test.ConvertAll(delegate(int i) { return i.ToString(); });
    watch.Stop(); Console.WriteLine(watch.Elapsed.ToString());

    Console.WriteLine((500000 - test.Count).ToString());
    Console.ReadLine();

}

static private List<Int32> GetList(int size)
{
    List<Int32> test = new List<Int32>();
    for (int i = 0; i < 500000; i++)
        test.Add(i);
    return test;
}

this only loops twice and removes eactly 100,000 items

My output for this code:

00:00:00.0099495 
00:00:00.1945987 
1000000

Updated to try a HashSet

static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        Stopwatch watch = new Stopwatch();
        do
        {
            // Test with list
            watch.Reset(); watch.Start();
            List<Int32> test = GetList(500000);
            watch.Stop(); Console.WriteLine(watch.Elapsed.ToString());
            watch.Reset(); watch.Start();
            List<String> myList = RemoveTest(test);
            watch.Stop(); Console.WriteLine(watch.Elapsed.ToString());
            Console.WriteLine((500000 - test.Count).ToString());
            Console.WriteLine();

            // Test with HashSet
            watch.Reset(); watch.Start();
            HashSet<String> test2 = GetStringList(500000);
            watch.Stop(); Console.WriteLine(watch.Elapsed.ToString());
            watch.Reset(); watch.Start();
            HashSet<String> myList2 = RemoveTest(test2);
            watch.Stop(); Console.WriteLine(watch.Elapsed.ToString());
            Console.WriteLine((500000 - test.Count).ToString());
            Console.WriteLine();
        } while (Console.ReadKey().Key != ConsoleKey.Escape);

    }

    static private List<Int32> GetList(int size)
    {
        List<Int32> test = new List<Int32>();
        for (int i = 0; i < 500000; i++)
            test.Add(i);
        return test;
    }

    static private HashSet<String> GetStringList(int size)
    {
        HashSet<String> test = new HashSet<String>();
        for (int i = 0; i < 500000; i++)
            test.Add(i.ToString());
        return test;
    }

    static private List<String> RemoveTest(List<Int32> list)
    {
        list.RemoveAll(t => t % 5 == 0);
        return list.ConvertAll(delegate(int i) { return i.ToString(); });
    }

    static private HashSet<String> RemoveTest(HashSet<String> list)
    {
        list.RemoveWhere(t => Convert.ToInt32(t) % 5 == 0);
        return list;
    }

This gives me:

00:00:00.0131586
00:00:00.1454723
100000

00:00:00.3459420
00:00:00.2122574
100000
share|improve this answer
    
See my second bullet/note -- I can't actually remove all i%5 - I just used that as an example. –  user807566 Aug 3 '11 at 13:56
    
What difernace does that make? i was just pointing out it works like its ment to unlike how you noted the 1st two of yours didnt. The key points are the times taken. We cant really help you any more than this with out getting a better idea of what you are really tring to do. –  Alex Aug 3 '11 at 14:10
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You could always remove the items from the end of the list. List removal is O(1) when performed on the last element since all it does is decrement count. There is no shifting of next elements involved. (which is the reason why list removal is O(n) generally)

for (int i = list.Count - 1; i >= 0; --i)
  list.RemoveAt(i);
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