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We are setting up a Team City build server. On previous VS 2008 projects a full version of Visual Studio has been installed on the build server.

We are now starting a VS 2010 project.

Is it possible to run MSTest tests on the Team City build server without installing Visual Studio?

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It is somehow possible even though quite cumbersome. Have a look at this article –  Joachim Rohde Aug 3 '11 at 13:17
    
possible duplicate of How to use MsTest in Continous Integration without VS? –  Ruben Bartelink Aug 3 '11 at 22:54
    
You sure that's for 2010? –  Ruben Bartelink Aug 3 '11 at 22:55
    
No, I'm not 100 % sure. But I needed to set up a CI-Server last week and had exactly the same problem that we couldn't execute MSTest tests. And after an extensive search I came to the conclusion that it's not possible without VS being installed. I also couldn't find any MSTest standalone-installer like it was announced, on the microsoft site. –  Joachim Rohde Aug 4 '11 at 9:56
    
Thanks for clarifying - seemed you were recommending executing such config butchery! I route around such madness by switching to a real test framework –  Ruben Bartelink Aug 4 '11 at 19:59

1 Answer 1

  1. Download the Visual Studio Agents 2010 ISO: http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=1334
  2. Mount/Extract the files and copy them to the agent server
  3. Run AutoRun and select to install Microsoft Visual Studio Test Agent 2010
  4. Install using the default settings
  5. Cancel out of the "configuration" dialog (you don't need the actual Agent running, just the installed libraries)

Your MSTest build step should run just fine now.

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Thank you. I feel like I dodged a bullet here. I've just downloaded Agents for Microsoft Visual Studio 2013 and installed it on our TeamCity server. Automated unit tests are now up and running without Visual Studio itself, or the horrible sounding manual setup business. –  Michael12345 Jan 3 at 1:40

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