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PHP:

$a = 2;
$b = 3;
if($b=1 && $a=5)
{
   $a++;
   $b++;
}
echo $a.'-'.$b;


$a = 2;
$b = 3;
if($a=5 and $b=1)
{
   $a++;
   $b++;
}
echo $a.'-'.$b;

Output 6-16-2.I don't understand the 1 here.

Perl :

$a = 2;
$b = 3;
if($b=1 && $a=5)
{
     $a++;                                                                            
     $b++;
}
print $a.'-'.$b;


$a = 2;
$b = 3;
if($a=5 and $b=1)
{
    $a++;
    $b++;
}
print $a.'-'.$b;

Output 6-66-2, I don't understand the second 6 here.

Anyone knows the reason?

Actually I know && has higher precedence than and,but I still has the doubt when knowing this before hand.

UPDATE

Now I understand the PHP one,what about the Perl one?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Regarding Perl:

Unlike PHP (but like Python, JavaScript, etc.) the boolean operators don't return a boolean value but the value that made the expression true (or the last value) determines the final result of the expression (source).

$b=1 && $a=5

is evaluated as

$b = (1 && $a=5) // same as in PHP

which is the same as $b = (1 && 5) (assignment "returns" the assigned value) and assigns 5 to $b.


The bottom line is: The operator precedence is the same in Perl and PHP (at least in this case), but they differ in what value is returned by the boolean operators.

FWIW, PHP's operator precedence can be found here.


What's more interesting (at least this was new to me) is that PHP does not perform type conversion for the increment/decrement operators.

So if $b is true, then $b++ leaves the value as true, while e.g. $b += 1 assigns 2 to $b.


†: What I mean with this is that it returns the first (leftmost) value which

  • evaluates to false in case of &&
  • evaluates to true in case of ||

or the last value of the expression.

share|improve this answer
    
In Python it returns first false-converted to false or last overwise. I think Perl do same way –  RiaD Aug 3 '11 at 14:05
    
@JeRog - a && expression will stop evaluating when a false value is encountered, so in 1&&0&&5, 0 is the last value. Likewise, 1&&undef&&5 will evaluate to undef. –  mob Aug 3 '11 at 14:08
1  
@Je Rog && returns its left argument if its left argument is false; otehrwise it returns its right argument. || returns its left argument if its left argument is true, otherwise it returns its right argument. So a chain of && returns the leftmost false value (or the last value if all were true) and a chain of || returns the leftmost true value (or the last value if all were false). –  hobbs Aug 3 '11 at 14:10
    
@RiaD: Right. I think a better way to express this is: It returns that value that determines the final result of the expression. Updated. –  Felix Kling Aug 3 '11 at 14:33

First example

$a = 2;
$b = 3;
if($b=1 && $a=5)  // means $b = (1 && $a=5)
{
   var_dump($b); //bool(true) because of &&
   $a++;
   $b++; //bool(true)++ ==true, ok
}
echo $a.'-'.$b;

hope you will not use those codes in production)

I'm noob in perl but i can suggest a&&b returns a or b (last of them if all of them converted to bool), not boolean, then $b = (1 && $a=5) returns $b=5 (is 5)

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+1,I understand the 1 now. –  Je Rog Aug 3 '11 at 13:35
    
This is very insightful, but stops short of answering the OP's question. Why does php consider $b to be boolean? And what the heck is perl doing in the OP's example? –  Asaph Aug 3 '11 at 13:36
    
Makes you wonder if putting the assignment in a conditional hinted PHP that you want a boolean instead of a number, so it cast to the wrong type... –  Dan Grossman Aug 3 '11 at 13:36
    
Now I found why it's boolean.(I consider itis because of operator priority ) –  RiaD Aug 3 '11 at 13:37
1  
@Asaph, obviously PHP is interpreting it as $b=(1 && $a=5). –  Je Rog Aug 3 '11 at 13:37

here's the issue: 1 && 5 returns 5 in perl. you get the result you expect if you code the conditional as if(($b=1) && ($a=5))

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For Perl, fig. 2: and has a very low priority in perl, it's not a synonym of &&'s. Therefore the sample is executed as (($a = 5) and ($b = 1)) which sets $a and $b to 5 and 1 respectively and returns a value of the last argument (i.e. 1).

After ++'s you get 6-2.

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refer to http://sillythingsthatmatter.in/PHP/operators.php for good examples

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