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I am stuck on specializing a template function for a lambda :

class X
{
  public:
    template <typename T>
    void f(T t) 
    { 
      std::cout << "awesome" << std::endl; 
    };

    template <>
    void f(double t) 
    {
      std::cout << "trouble" << std::endl; // Works
    }

    template <>
    void f(??? t) // what to put here?
    {
      std::cout << "lambda" << std::endl;
    }  
};


X x;
x.f(42); // prints "awesome"
x.f(1.12); // prints "trouble"
x.f([](){ std::cout << "my lazy lambda" << std::endl; }); // should print "lambda"

Casting the lambda to a std::function before passing to f and specializing for this type works, but is tedious to write. Is there a solution in C++0x?

Edit: I am totally fine with a solution, which would enable me to specialize for a callable if the last line of passing a lambda works.

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1  
thus the answer seems to be: No, there is no way in C++0x to avoid the cast and specialize a template for matching lambdas. –  Christopher Oezbek Aug 3 '11 at 14:38
2  
as it been discussed before (stackoverflow.com/questions/4661875/…), it's impossible to distinguish lambda function from other callable objects –  Gene Bushuyev Aug 3 '11 at 16:36

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

you cannot do this directly: the type of the lambda is created by the compiler and is different for each lambda. You can specialize for it, but it would be for that type only (see example below). You can remove some of the tediousness though by using a small function for converting lambda -> std::function.

auto myLambda = [](){ std::cout << "myLambda" << std::endl; };

class X
{
  public:
    template <typename T>
    void f( T t )
    { 
      std::cout << "not so awesome" << std::endl; 
    };

    void f( const std::function< void() >& f )
    {
      std::cout << "function" << std::endl;
    }

    void f( const decltype( myLambda )& f )
    {
      std::cout << "myLambda" << std::endl;
    }
};

  //helper for lambda -> function
template< class T >
std::function< void() > Function( const T& f )
{
  return std::function< void() >( f );
}

X x;
x.f( myLambda ); //prints "myLambda"
x.f( Function( [](){ std::cout << "blah" << std::endl; } ) ); //prints "function"
x.f( [](){ std::cout << "blah" << std::endl; } ); //still won't work: not the same type as myLambda!
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the last line will never match lambda, because every lambda has a different unique type –  Gene Bushuyev Aug 3 '11 at 16:28

The following is a variation of the good old sizeof trick. Maybe it can be done with decltype alone. It does not exactly check if its a lambda, but if it is callable. If you want to filter out other callable things, you can use C++0x type traits to check if they are functions, member functions, composit objects etc.

#include <functional>
#include <iostream>
#include <type_traits>

template<class T>
char is_callable( const T& t, decltype( t())* = 0 );

long is_callable( ... );

class X
{
  public:
    template <typename T>
    void f( const T& t, typename std::enable_if<sizeof(is_callable(t)) !=1>::type* = 0 )
    {
      std::cout << "awesome" << std::endl;
    };

    void f(double )
    {
      std::cout << "trouble" << std::endl; // Works
    }

    template<class T>
    void f( const T& t, typename std::enable_if<sizeof(is_callable(t)) == 1>::type* = 0 )
    {
      std::cout << "lambda" << std::endl;
    }
};

int main(int argc, const char *argv[])
{
    X x;
    x.f(42); // prints "awesome"
    x.f(1.12); // prints "trouble"
    x.f([](){ std::cout << "my lazy lambda" << std::endl; }); // should print "lambda"
}
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2  
That won't specialize for lambdas, only callable types- not the same thing. –  Puppy Aug 3 '11 at 15:16
    
and that's probably the best one can do, maybe only changing sfinae to test for exact signature, not all callable types –  Gene Bushuyev Aug 3 '11 at 16:56
    
@DeadMG: I am totally fine with matching any callable as long as I can avoid the cast at the end. –  Christopher Oezbek Aug 4 '11 at 6:04

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