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Is there any dark, obscured way to convert all of the method parameters to an object[]?

While implementing the integration between two systems using a message broker, I noticed that most of the methods exposed by the broker uses a lot of parameters.

I want an easy way to log each call to the broker with every parameter. Something like:

[WebMethod]
public void CreateAccount(string arg1, int arg2, DateTime arg3, ... ) {
    object[] args = GetMethodArgs();
    string log = args.Aggregate("", (current, next) => string.Format("{0}{1};", current, next));
    Logger.Log("Creating new Account: " + args);

    // create account logic
}

I'm curious if C# provides something that simulates GetMethodArgs();

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1  
Try this previous question: stackoverflow.com/questions/3288597/… –  Ash Eldritch Aug 3 '11 at 14:45

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You could just have 2 methods.

[WebMethod]
public void CreateAccount(string arg1, int arg2, DateTime arg3)
{ 
    CreateAccountImpl(arg1, arg2, arg3);
}

protected void CreateAccountImpl(params object[] args)
{
    string log = args.Aggregate("", (current, next) => string.Format("{0}{1};", current, next));
    Logger.Log("Creating new Account: " + args);

    // create account logic
}
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Then you have to know the position and type of the arguments for the rest of the create account logic. –  Ray Aug 3 '11 at 14:55
    
I adapted your solution to reach something more generic. The CreateAccountImpl was renamed to LogMessage. It gets a params object[] args and log then. The create account logic will stay on the create account method right after the LogMessage call. –  Daniel Aug 3 '11 at 16:47

PostSharp can capture this using a method boundary aspect. Here's some sample code to see it in action.

public sealed class Program
{
    public static void Main()
    {
        Go("abc", 234);
    }

    [ParamAspect]
    static void Go(string a, int b)
    {
    }
}

[Serializable]
public class ParamAspect : OnMethodBoundaryAspect
{
    public override void OnEntry(MethodExecutionArgs args)
    {
        object[] argumentContents = args.Arguments.ToArray();
        foreach (var ar in argumentContents)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(ar);
        }
    }
}

The output is:

abc
234
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PostSharp looks like the best option, but it seems to have some compatibility issues with .net framework 3.5 –  Daniel Aug 3 '11 at 16:41
    
@Daniel: I've been using PostSharp with .NET 3.5 without any trouble at all. I know they made significant changes in their application a year or two ago, so it's possible that older versions might have a problem - but if you stick with current versions, I'd expect you'll be fine. –  Joe Enos Aug 3 '11 at 17:46
    
I've download the 2.0.9.3 version and when I try to reference the dll it says that 'PostSharp.dll', or one of its dependencies, requires a later version of the .NET Framework. –  Daniel Aug 4 '11 at 8:45
    
It's definitely a VS problem, not a framework or PostSharp problem (maybe an installation problem, but not runtime). I noticed that I got the same warning in VS2010 with .NET 3.5, but I ignored it, and the app still worked properly. VS2008 seems ok, and VS2010 with .NET 4.0 is ok, but there's something weird about this reference with VS2010/3.5. But if you're feeling lucky, I'd say go ahead and use it and you should be fine. –  Joe Enos Aug 4 '11 at 16:00
    
I promise I'll give it a try. Thanks for the tip –  Daniel Aug 4 '11 at 23:48

For logging/auditing purposes, I have used Castle.DynamicProxy to wrap the Web Service implementation. All method calls are intercepted and passed to an IInterceptor object that has access to the parameters and the return value.

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