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In my Java application I want to output striked letters (like html tag do). Is there any way to do this using Unicode (combine )

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No, this is not possible. While there is the concept of a stroke as diacritic, it's not available as a separate Unicode character, probably because the various letters that use a stroke diacritic do not place it at the same height or even angle. So the result would not resemble strikethrough markup anyway.

To output strikethrough text in Java, you need to use an output format that allows you to use explicit markup. If you have a Swing app, you're in luck as many Swing components support HTML. Otherwise it depends on what presentation technology you're using.

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You’ve given a good answer why the WITH STROKE code points have no decompositions that include any sort of stroke combining character, like ø U+00F8 LATIN SMALL LETTER O WITH STROKE or đ U+0111 LATIN SMALL LETTER D WITH STROKE (not to be confused with ð 00F0 LATIN SMALL LETTER ETH). Interestingly, these are considered “the same letters” as o and d respectively and yes even in the ETH, as shown by the UCA DUCET. So a primary-strength UCA would count them as the base chars they don’t decompose to. –  tchrist Aug 4 '11 at 14:48
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No. Unicode does not define a combining strikeout mark. Unicode's view is that this is the job of markup -- like HTML.

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As said before, Unicode doesn't do that, but a lot of Swing components understand basic HTML tags.

JLabel label = new JLabel("<html><s>My stroke</s></html>")
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